Professor Paula T. Hammond
    
Professor Paula T. Hammond

2016 Habermann Lecture

The Department of Chemistry is pleased to announce that this year's Habermann Lecture will be given by Prof. Paula T. Hammond, the David H. Koch Chair Professor of Engineering in the Chemical Engineering Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The lecture, "Polymer-Nucleic Acid Nano-Assemblies and Concatenated siRNA Delivery," will be held on Tuesday, April 26, 2016.

Professor Paula T. Hammond is the David H. Koch Chair Professor of Engineering in the Chemical Engineering Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of MITís Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. She serves as the Department Head of the Chemical Engineering Department at MIT. The core of her work is the use of electrostatics and other complementary interactions to generate functional polymer materials with highly controlled architecture. Her research in nanotechnology encompasses the development of new biomaterials to enable drug delivery from surfaces with spatiotemporal control. She also investigates novel responsive polymer architectures for targeted nanoparticle drug and gene delivery, and self-assembled materials systems for electrochemical energy devices. Professor Hammond was elected into the 2013 Class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also the recipient of the 2013 AIChE Charles M. A. Stine Award, which is bestowed annually to a leading researcher in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of materials science and engineering, and the AIChE Alpha Chi Sigma Award for Chemical Engineering Research. She was selected to receive the Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Teal Innovator Award in 2013, which supports a single visionary individual from any field principally outside of ovarian cancer to focus his/her creativity, innovation, and leadership on ovarian cancer research. Prof. Hammond serves as an Associate Editor of the American Chemical Society journal, ACS Nano. As a part of the Year of Chemistry in 2011, she was one of the Top 100 materials scientists named by Thomson-Reuters, a recognition of the highest citation impact in the field over the past decade (2001-2011), and Worldís Most Influential Scientific Minds in 2014. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers, and the American Chemical Society Polymer Division. Professor Hammondís work on multilayer tattoos for transdermal DNA vaccines was recently featured on the PBS Nova program, "Making Stuff" with David Pogue, and she was also featured in the Chemical Heritage Foundationís Catalyst Series: Women in Chemistry.

History

Eugene Habermann was born and raised in the city of Milwaukee, not far from Marquette University. He served in the Army during World War II and then attended Marquette University under the GI bill, receiving a BS degree in business administration in 1958, while working full-time as a time-study analyst at Briggs & Stratton. Mr. Habermann never married and lived with other members of his family. He was described as a "jovial, pleasant man, with a good sense of humor." A relative, noting his frugality, stated, "He was a sharp investor. It wasn't a hobby for him."

Mr. Habermann admired chemists who were well-trained and knew their art and thus established the Habermann-Pfletschinger Chair in Chemistry at Marquette University in honor of his parents.

The Habermann Lecture series is to perpetuate the memory of Eugene Habermann and to recognize his generosity and support of Marquette University and our chemistry department.

Previous Habermann Lecturers


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