Clinical Laboratory Science

75th ANNIVERSARY Marquette University College of Health Sciences

Clinical Laboratory Science 1938 - 2013

Program History, Administrative Structure and Program Directors
Marquette University was a true pioneer in the development of the Clinical Laboratory Science profession. At its roots it existed as a collection of “lab girls” who were trained on the job by pathologists to perform tests on human specimens, thereby freeing the pathologist to focus on anatomical pathology (autopsies, evaluation of tissue biopsies, etc.) The Marquette University School of Medicine offered non-credit courses in Medical Technology (later named Clinical Laboratory Science) to women as early as 1917.

These courses, under the direction of Dr. Bernard McGrath, continued until 1925 when the School of Hospital Administration was organized and medical technology became one of the elective programs in the school. During this time a program leading to a certificate in medical technology was conducted at the medical school and Trinity Hospital. The School of Hospital Administration closed in 1928 which was the same year that the Board of Registry for Medical Technologists of the American Society for Clinical Pathologists was formed. In order to qualify for the registry students took two years of college work and a year of internship in an approved hospital.

In 1928 Dr. John Grill of the Department of Pathology of the medical school was in charge of the program. No degree was granted and the clinical work took place at St. Joseph’s Hospital and the Milwaukee County Hospital. Student enrollment averaged about six per year during this era.


CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

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