Image used with permission from the Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art
"Father Marquette and the Indians," painted in 1869 by Wilhelm Alfred Lamprecht, is a romantic version of Marquette's encounter with Native Americans along the Mississippi River during his exploration of the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi in the early 1670s. He was also one of the first Europeans to visit the area now occupied by Milwaukee. Marquette University celebrates its connection to the intrepid Jesuit in a number of ways, most notably with the Père Marquette Discovery Award, the university's highest honor, which has been awarded only five times since 1969: to the Apollo 11 astronauts, the theologian Rev. Karl Rahner, SJ, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Rev. Desmond Tuto in 2003, and the "Little Rock Nine" in 2010. The award recognizes the spirit of discovery that animates the University.

Students and parents often ask some variation of this question: “What can you do with a History degree?” As historians, we honestly believe the answer is: “What can’t you do with a History degree?”

A History degree not only hones the essential skills required in practically any professional career or calling, but also sparks the imagination and cultivates a curiosity for understanding the complexity of the world and its peoples. Knowledge, skills, imagination and curiosity are the bedrock upon which a well-grounded and well-rounded life are built. A Marquette History degree lays this foundation, opening doors to a lifetime of fulfillment through learning, cultural appreciation, and civic responsibility.

History majors may consider a variety of careers and fields upon graduation. We have listed a few options below with suggestions for courses, secondary majors, internships and organizations that may help you determine what you can do with your history majors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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