Special 
	Collections and Archives

Formation, Vocation and Pastoral Ministries



CONFERENCE FOR PASTORAL PLANNING AND COUNCIL DEVELOPMENT RECORDS,  1973-present, 10.0 feet (unprocessed).

Files of a service organization for pastors, lay leaders, and diocesan staff, formed to promote "consultative processes."


KISEMANITO CENTRE COLLECTION, 1981-1986, n.d., 4.6 feet (1.2 feet unprocessed).

Recordings of Native Catholic ministry formation classes and public celebrations in Canada that pertain to Native Christian beliefs, ceremonies, psychology, alcohol use prevention, and native legal status. Some presenters are from the United States.


NATIONAL BLACK SISTERS' CONFERENCE RECORDS, 1968-present, 4.7 feet.

Records of a United States based organization of women religious, founded in 1968. Its purpose has been to provide ongoing communication, focusing on the education and support of African American women religious while confronting racism in society and the Catholic Church. The records include correspondence, minutes, unpublished papers, presentations, conference materials, and other materials documenting the programs and services provided by the National Black Sisters Conference (NBSC). Also included are records from its Development of Educational Services in the Growing Nation (DESIGN) program.
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NATIONAL CATHOLIC VOCATION COUNCIL RECORDS, ca. 1976-1986, 15.3 feet(unprocessed).

Records of a coordinating body for Catholic vocation organizations (succeeded by the National Coalition for Church Vocations).


NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF DIOCESAN VOCATION DIRECTORS RECORDS,1958-present, 3.9 feet.

Records of a professional membership organization offering training and assessment opportunities to national and international diocesan vocation offices. Records include meeting minutes, Executive Directors' subject files, convention proceedings and programs, newsletters, publications, regional activities, and the Committee on Vocations. [Connect to Inventory]


NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF RELIGIOUS VOCATION DIRECTORS RECORDS, ca. 1964-1987, 14.7 feet (unprocessed).

Records of an organization of men religious in the vocation apostolate. It merged in 1988 with the National Sisters Vocation Conference to form the National Religious Vocation Conference.


NATIONAL INTERFAITH COALITION ON AGING RECORDS, 1971-present, 4.0 feet.

Correspondence, minutes, publications, reports, audio recordings, and related records documenting the programs and services of the National Interfaith Coalition on Aging (NICA). Included are project files for its Survey on Programs for the Aging Under Religious Auspices and for Project-GIST (Gerontology in Seminary Training), which sought to enhance the ability of the religious community to serve the needs of the aging by improving the knowledge and skills of seminary educators. Also documented is NICA's involvement with the White House Conference on Aging, which included sponsorship of the National Intra-Decade Conference on the Spiritual Well-Being of the Elderly (1977) and an official mini-conference of the 1981 WHCOA, the National Symposium on Spiritual and Ethical Value Systems Concerns, which NICA convened in 1980. NICA dissolved as a corporation at the end of 1990 and reorganized as a constituent unit of the National Council on the Aging. It affiliated with the American Society on Aging in 2010, as a subcommittee of the Forum on Religion, Spirituality, and Aging.
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NATIONAL RELIGIOUS VOCATION CONFERENCE RECORDS, 1988-present, 6.0 feet.

Records of an organization of vocation ministers for religious congregations, formed by the merger of the National Sisters Vocation Conference and the National Conference of Religious Vocation Directors.


NATIONAL SISTERS VOCATION CONFERENCE RECORDS, 1966-1987, 2.7 feet

Records of an organization of women religious in the vocation apostolate. It merged in 1988 with the National Conference of Religious Vocation Directors to form the National Religious Vocation Conference.


SIOUX SPIRITUAL CENTER RECORDS (PLAINVIEW, SOUTH DAKOTA), 1972-, n.d. (3.6 feet unprocessed).

Photographs, minutes, printed materials, and video recordings pertaining to Brulé, Hunkpapa, Oglala, Sans Arc, and other Indian Catholics and their activities at the Sioux Spiritual Center, Plainview, South Dakota. Jesuits, under the auspices of the Diocese of Rapid City, administer the center. Included are interviews of Bishop Harold Dimmerling and several Indian deacons regarding their experiences in the deacon formation program and their expectations as permanent deacons.


SISTER FORMATION CONFERENCE/RELIGIOUS FORMATION CONFERENCE RECORDS, 1936-present, 40.3 feet.

Records of an organization, founded in 1954 as the Sister Formation Conference (the name changed in 1976 when men formation personnel were added to its membership), which helped bring about a dramatic change in the status of women religious within the Catholic Church and within American society as a whole, including general correspondence and subject files, minutes of meetings of the national leadership, records of conferences and workshops, and publications issued by the Conference. Personal papers of Ritamary Bradley and Annette Walters concerning their involvement in the Sister Formation movement are also included. The conflict in the early 1960s between the Sister Formation Conference officers and the leadership of the Conference of Major Superiors of Women over the restructuring of the SFC to more directly subordinate it to the CMSW is especially well documented in correspondence, memoranda, and reports. Notable correspondents include Ritamary Bradley, Michael Novak, Mary Emil Penet, David Riesman, and Annette Walters.
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SODALITY MOVEMENT/CHRISTIAN LIFE COMMUNITY-USA RECORDS, 1912-present, 25.0 feet.

Records of the United States branch of the Sodality/Christian Life Communities movement, founded to promote social action and devotion to Mary among lay Catholics, including correspondence, reports, and publications.
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