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Invocations

Photo essay by Ben Smidt


They are carved in wood, molded in clay and spun in glass. They depict suffering and hope. They are a symbol of God’s love, and they are present at Marquette  in chapels, of course, but also above chalkboards and classroom doors, in admissions offices and at stairwells, perched on desks and propped upon bookshelves. A cross is a spot of faith in a sterile chemistry lab. The crucifix is the sign for all Christians of the triumph of good over evil, of victory and not defeat. And it is a sign of God’s infinite love for men and women. Here are some of the crosses we found at Marquette.

Comments


Comment by Stephanie Patrick at Jul 17 2010 06:55 pm
Phenomenal! It was spiritually delightful and inspiring! Thank you, I wish there were more to view...
Comment by Tom Lorsung J1960 at Jul 19 2010 02:11 pm
Excellent, creative concept, illustrative of the underlying spirit of Marquette. Well done!
Comment by Richard Hornick at Jul 19 2010 07:42 pm
A great idea for a photo essay! Makes one REALIZE rather than KNOW how many varied crucifix expressions there are.
Comment by Mike Schifano '71 at Jul 20 2010 06:09 am
Its great to see Marquette still has a Catholic nature. However many of the photo's depicted crosses, some difficult to recognize, and not the crucifix. Hopefully this was a mistake and artistic zeal took over. It was still a nice presentation.
Comment by Michelle Hutchinson Schofield '92 at Jul 27 2010 11:57 am
wonderful photo essay....thank you for reminding all alumni of the presence of Christ throughout Marquette...
Comment by Bill Carley, J1958 at Jul 31 2010 10:52 am
Wonderful display of religious art. But it needs more information on each work -- where was it made, who was the artist, when was it made, and what style is it supposed to represent? For example, one cross appears to be a "Christo", which were stunningly beautiful crosses carved from wood by the Spanish settlers of New Mexico in the 19th century, but a viewer can't tell that for sure from these pictures. Also needed: location of these crosses, so if one wishes to view them he knows where to go. In short, give us more.
Comment by Marquette Magazine at Jul 31 2010 06:10 pm
Bill,

Thank you for taking the time to comment and for your thoughts. You weren't the first wanting more information! If you click on "Show info" at the top of the slideshow box, you'll find out more. Hope this provides more insight about our beautiful campus crosses.
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