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Graduation by the numbers



The Class of 2013 knows how to celebrate. Armed with dazzled mortar boards, silly string and a whole lot of school pride, Marquette's newest batch of alumni took the BMO Harris Bradley Center by storm Sunday morning. They whooped and hollered as university administrators announced each college. One especially ecstatic physical therapy grad even went crowd surfing. It was certainly a day to remember for the 2,033 university graduates. Here's a preliminary look at how the graduating class breaks down.

1,234 undergraduates

401 graduate students (90 from the Graduate School of Management and 311 in the Graduate School)

80 dental students

106 health sciences professional students (46 physician assistants and 60 physical therapists)

212 law students

33 earned their Ph.D.

Among the undergrads:

  • 381 from the Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences

  • 279 from the College of Business Administration

  • 168 from the J. William and Mary Diederich College of Communication

  • 143 from the College of Engineering

  • 176 from the College of Health Sciences

  • 80 from the College of Nursing

  • College of Professional Studies: 12 undergraduate students and 36 graduate students

The 10 departments with the greatest number of graduates were: Biomedical Sciences, Nursing, Psychology, Marketing, Finance, Accounting, Political Science, Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Writing-intensive English.

Note: Students in the College of Education typically do not graduate until June, after they have completed student-teaching. They would otherwise be included in this list. 

Comments


Comment by Karen Camara at May 22 2013 01:38 pm
While I know it's probably a small number, I see no recognition of the College of Professional Studies graduates and feel there should be. We (I am a continuing senior!) work just as hard and sometimes it may take longer than the traditional four years, which in itself is a good thing and worth talking about!
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