Tuesday, December 6

Marquette

Global NEWSLETTER

 
 

news from the office of international education

Marquette Journalism Students Go Global

Matteo Ricci, c. 1850 (w/c on paper), Weld, Charles (fl. 1850) / By Permission of the Governors of Stonyhurst College / The Bridgeman Art Library

Marquette journalism students are getting hands-on experience this semester in two unique international reporting projects, collaborating with college students across the globe.

Students in instructor Sandra Whitehead’s “Digital Media Bootcamp” course are working with other college journalism students from around the world this semester to produce news stories for the two projects – PopUp Newsroom and the Global E-News Immersion Initiative.

"These projects help students develop their reporting and writing skills in the context of writing for international audiences,” said Whitehead. “They gain an understanding of the complexities of covering a foreign culture and develop the sensitivity required to interview people of different cultural, ethnic and religious traditions."

 

The PopUp News Project engaged journalism students from nine universities in seven countries in a global social media reporting project to cover the 2016 United States’ presidential elections. The MU students and their counterparts produced multimedia news stories about the U.S. elections from their local perspectives. The stories were posted on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram with the common hashtag #popupelections. Each university took turns curating the articles to post on the project’s website.

 

Partner universities include the Asian College of Journalism in India, California State University – Northridge in the United States, Coventry University and Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, Media University Stuttgart in Germany, Rafik Hariri University in Lebanon, Swinburne University in Australia and Utrecht School of Journalism in the Netherlands. Continue Reading.

 

Student Profile: Hella Andreassen

Photo of alfombras

Hella Andreassen is an international student from Norway. She attended high school in Sussex, Wis. and returned to the Milwaukee area for college.

Name: Hella J.T. Andreassen
Year in School: Freshman
Hometown: Horten, Norway
Major: Arts and Sciences College, Undecided

You attended Hamilton High School in Sussex, Wis. as an exchange student. Why did you decided to return to Milwaukee?
I always wanted to study abroad after high school, so it just made sense to me to go back to a place I already knew and I already had a well-established support system in the shape of friends and (host) family. I also really like big city life, and compared to where I am from, Milwaukee is huge!


Why did you choose Marquette University?
I applied to a couple of schools in America and Europe but Marquette stood out to me because of the interactions I had with the Office of International Education since the first day I showed interest in Marquette. Earlier this year I flew over from Norway to visit my friends and to do some college tours. Even on a grey afternoon in February, I absolutely loved the campus!


How has your adjustment from Norway to Milwaukee been?
Seeing as I have lived here before, I did not experience culture shock or anything along those lines. However, college is a lot harder than both American and Norwegian high school, so even though my English it not that bad, I have struggled a little with the language aspect.


How has the Office of International Education helped with your transition?
I remember after my first day of classes I ran down to the OIE just to have a chat with my advisor Susan, because I felt really overwhelmed and needed someone to calm me down. OIE has done a lot to help me settle in. They have been huge support system in the sense that they will always talk me through stuff. They also schedule events where I have met a lot of other great exchange/international students.


You participate in Marquette’s Friendship Family Program. Can you tell me about your experience?

Another international student and I were assigned to a local couple, an American woman and a French woman, that we spend time with and share our culture with. I really enjoy spending time with them, especially the French woman because of our common European roots. At the first Friendship Program meeting I was reunited with some students I met at Marquette's international orientation, so I got to meet their families as well. It is a wonderful program. Continue reading.

 

 

The Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program

Fulbright logo

The Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad program application deadline is December 28, 2016.

This year, programs will be offered in Bulgaria, Chile and Thailand. This opportunity allows U.S. educators in the social sciences and humanities to partake in short-term study and travel to expand their cultural knowledge. Accepted applicants will join in educational lectures and activities such as visits to local schools, cultural sites and organizations. Once back in the United States, participants can draw on their experiences abroad to create a cross-cultural curriculum in their classrooms.

The program covers airfare, room and board and program costs. Sixteen spots per program are available for eligible applicants. Visit the website for more information.

 

What Does it Mean to be Both Muslim and American?

Applications are now open for the 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for K-12 School Teachers.

The program runs from July 9-28, 2017 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The program brings educators together to study texts and go on field trips to explore the diverse facets of Muslim American identity both grounded in the past and experienced in the present. As an NEH Summer Scholar, participants will reflect on and discuss 30 primary source documents and two major academic monographs; visit two mosques; and make a final presentation about how they will integrate teaching about Muslim Americans into their classroom. All participants will receive a $2,700 stipend. The application deadline is March 1, 2017 and accepted applicants will be notified on March 31, 2017. Visit the website for more information.

Student Ambassador - Opus College of Engineering

Are you and international student interested in sharing your experiences in the Opus College of Engineering with prospective students and families?

Want to sharpen your communication and presentation skills? Apply for the new Student Ambassador position, and join a team of current students who will help recruit future students who love MU engineering as much as you do. We are seeking academically strong students who have a diversity of experience in the college and at MU. Applications are available now in Handshake, and interested students are encouraged to apply by December 16 for employment from January through May 2017. For questions, please contact Julie Murphy, director for enrollment management, at julie.h.murphy@mu.edu or 414-288-5769.

Marquette Professor Publishes Results on Dust Storms in the Middle East

Professor of environmental engineering Dr. Anthony Parolari and team investigated the massive dust storm that tore through the Middle East in September 2015.

Parolari led a team studying the climate conditions of the Middle East and concluded that recent dust storms have been due to extreme drought, not regional conflict as popularly believed.

Severe dust storms have been a problem of the Middle East this year, sending thousands to hospitals while affecting parts of Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Jordan, Israel and Cyprus. The popular reported causes of the storms have been focused on the regional conflict in the area which has led to reduced irrigation and desertion of agricultural land. Parolari’s research, however, finds that extreme drought and heat have been the causal factors of the dust storms.

“While climate, land use and conflict are all important factors in the complex human–environment dynamics that have been playing out in the Middle East as far back as 4,000 years ago, this particular storm appears to be explained by climate, not conflict and abandonment of agricultural land,” said Parolari.

Read the full story of Parolari’s study on Urban Milwaukee.

 
 
 
 
 

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