Students

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

Course Descriptions

 

PHYS 1001. General Physics 1

4 sem. hrs.
Newton's laws, linear motion, circular and harmonic motion, fluids, heat, kinetic theory, wave motion and sound. Offered fall term. Prereq: High school algebra, geometry, and trigonometry or equivalent.

PHYS 1002. General Physics 2

4 sem. hrs.
Continuation of PHYS 1001. Electrostatics, DC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, light, optical instruments, interference and diffraction of light, modern physics. Offered spring term. Prereq: PHYS 1001.

PHYS 1003. General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1

4 sem. hrs.
Survey of classical physics for science majors and engineering majors. Kinematics in one and two dimensions. Newton's laws of motion and dynamics, including rotation of rigid bodies. Energy concepts in physical systems. Newton's law of universal gravitation. The first law of thermodynamics, harmonic motion, and Einstein's special relativity. A command of high school algebra, geometry and trigonometry is assumed. Requires the use of introductory calculus. Offered fall term. Coreq: MATH 1450.

PHYS 1004. General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2

4 sem. hrs.
A continuation of PHYS 1003. A survey of classical electromagnetic theory, with an introduction to modern physics. Electricity and magnetism: Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, the electric field and the electric potential, DC circuits, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, electromagnetic waves. Classical and quantum waves, interference, thermodynamics and an introduction to statistical mechanics. Offered spring term. Prereq: PHYS 1003 and MATH 1450, Coreq: MATH 1451.

PHYS 1005. Perspectives in Physical Sciences

3 sem. hrs.
Basic concepts in the physical sciences and their impact on technology, the humanities and the world. Course designed for non-science majors. This course satisfies the Arts and Sciences core curriculum requirement. Offered occasionally.

PHYS 1007. Survey of Meteorology

3 sem. hrs.
An introduction to the science of the atmosphere as it relates to the weather of the earth. Topics will include the gas laws, heat transfer, causes of the seasons, atmospheric optics, humidity, clouds, atmospheric stability, causes of precipitation, atmospheric motions, air masses, fronts and pressure systems, thunderstorms, tornados, and hurricanes. Emphasis will be put on how weather is forecast and how it relates to everyone's life. This course satisfies the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum Natural Science requirement. Offered fall term.

PHYS 1008. Astronomy and Space Physics

3 sem. hrs.
Physics of the solar system, stars, galaxies and the universe. Experimental methods of observational astronomy, telescopes, and space probes. Special topics such as black holes, neutron stars, and quasars are covered. This course satisfies the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum Natural Science requirement.

PHYS 1009. Earth and Environmental Physics

3 sem. hrs.
Impact of human activities on the environment, especially the consumption of fossil fuels. Population distribution and growth. Energy balance of the earth. Energy, land and water use, the water cycle. Effects of chemical and physical pollutants on water and the atmosphere. Course designed for non-science majors. This course satisfies the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum Natural Science requirement.

PHYS 1013. Classical Physics 1: Mechanics and Waves

4 sem. hrs.
A study of motion in its various forms, translational, rotational, and vibrational, that emphasizes their underlying unity, especially the central role of energy and its conservation, and their basis in the fundamental Newtonian laws of motion and Einstein's special relativity. These ideas are used to explain thermal processes. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab., 1 hr. quiz. Prereq: MATH 1450, which may be taken concurrently. A command of high school algebra, geometry, trigonometry is assumed. Requires the use of introductory calculus. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1003 and PHYS 1013.

PHYS 1014. Classical Physics 2: Heat, Electromagnetism, and Optics

4 sem. hrs.
This course, continuing the development of energy as a fundamental concept, includes a study of electric and magnetic phenomena, and their unification in the theory of electromagnetism. Applications are made to waves, geometric and physical optics, atomic spectra, and nuclear decay and introductory quantum mechanics including wave function and bound systems. Prereq: MATH 1450, MATH 1451 or MATH 1455 which may be taken concurrently, and PHYS 1003 or PHYS 1013. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1004 and PHYS 1014.

PHYS 1018. Introduction to Research

0 sem. hrs.
An overview of research activity, specialties, and opportunities for undergraduate research is provided through an in-depth visit each week to a different research laboratory at Marquette University and the Medical College of Wisconsin. All science students interested in learning about research are encouraged to take this course. SNC/UNC grade assessment.

PHYS 1020. Physics Laboratory Only

1 sem. hr. PHYS 1003 lab in Fall, PHYS 1004 Lab in Spring. Cons. of Dept.

PHYS 1030. Physics Lecture Only

1-6 sem. hrs. PHYS 1003 lecture in Fall, PHYS 1004 Lecture in Spring. Cons. of Dept.

PHYS 2004. Modern Physics: Atoms, Particles and Quanta

3 sem. hrs.
A survey of 20th century physics concentrating on atoms and particles. Quantum mechanics: origins, the Schrödinger equation, the hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms and angular momentum. Introduction to special relativity. Nuclear structure, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission and fusion. Elementary particles, conservation laws, reactions, the Standard Model, and cosmology. Offered fall term. Prereq: MATH 2450 and PHYS 1002; MATH 2450 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1014. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 2005. Modern Physics: The States of Matter

3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the physics of matter and materials. Atoms and the forces between them, molecules, the states of matter, kinetic theory, perfect and imperfect gases. Statistical physics: classical statistics and the Boltzmann factor, quantum statistics. The solid state: cohesion and structure, electrical, magnetic, thermal and elastic properties. The liquid state: cohesion and structure, latent heat and melting, flow in ideal and real liquids. Offered spring term. Prereq: MATH 2450 and PHYS 1002; MATH 2450 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1014. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 2049. Computational Physics

3 sem. hrs.
Computational techniques applied to problems in the physical sciences. Construction of models of physical systems. Generation and analysis of data. The role of models in developing physical theories. Course assignments will use a variety of programming environments and commercial software. Offered occasionally.

PHYS 2055. Electronics Lab

2 sem. hrs.
Introduction to electronic measuring equipment and circuits. Voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters, oscilloscopes, DC and AC circuits, resistance, impedance, passive and active filters, power supplies, op-amps, amplifiers, and analog-digital conversion. An introduction to error analysis and precision of measurement. Offered spring term. Prereq: PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014.

PHYS 3011. Classical Mechanics

3 sem. hrs.
Three-dimensional motion of a particle in both Cartesian and spherical coordinate systems. Newtonian dynamics, the classical harmonic oscillator, central forces. Lagrange and Hamilton's formulations of analytical mechanics, angular momentum, Kepler's problem, and the dynamics of a rigid body. Coupled oscillators. Offered fall term. Prereq: MATH 2451 and PHYS 1002; MATH 2451 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2451 and PHYS 1014. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 3021. Introduction to Theoretical Astrophysics

3 sem. hrs.
Introduction to astrophysical problems, with emphasis on underlying physical principles; including the nature of stars, equations of state, stellar energy generation, stellar structure and evolution, astrophysical neutrinos, binary stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars, novae, and supernovae. Offered occasionally during fall term. This course does not count towards the physics major. Prereq: PHYS 1013 and PHYS 1014 or PHYS 1003 and PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1001 and PHYS 1002 and cons. of instr.

PHYS 3022. Introduction to Observational Astronomy

3 sem. hrs.
Nature of the Milky Way galaxy from an observer's prospective: stellar statistics and distributions, stellar populations, spiral structure, the Galactic nucleus, and the Galactic halo. Nature of ordinary galaxies, galaxies in our Local Group, structure of voids and ands superclusters. Nature of peculiar objects: Seyfert galaxies, starburst galaxies, and quasars. Elementary aspects of physical cosmology. Introduction to techniques used in modern optical and radio astronomy with emphasis on the physical and mathematical understanding of the detection of electromagnetic radiation. Offered occasionally during spring term. Prereq: PHYS 1013/1014 or PHYS 1003/1004 or (PHYS 1001/1002 with consent of instructor) and PHYS 1008 and PHYS 2004 and PHYS 3021.

PHYS 3056. Contemporary Physics Lab 1

2 sem. hrs.
Experiments in molecular, nuclear, atomic, solid state physics, and in geometrical and physical optics. Application of error analysis, precision of measurement, and propagation of errors. Offered fall term. Prereq: PHYS 2055.

PHYS 3953. Biophysics Seminar

1 sem. hr.
The frontiers of research in biophysics, and the techniques employed, are explored through attending the weekly Biophysics Seminar at the Medical College of Wisconsin and participating in a follow-on discussion after each seminar. Offered both fall and spring terms. Prereq: Jr. standing. May be taken more than once for credit. This course may not be used to satisfy the 30 cr. hr. minimum requirements for a bachelor's degree in physics.

PHYS 3995. Undergraduate Research

1-3 sem. hrs.
Experimental or theoretical research in an area of contemporary physics under the guidance of a physics faculty member who has expertise in that area. Successful completion of the course includes a summary paper and an oral presentation to the regular physics faculty. This course may not be used to satisfy the 30 cr. hr. minimum requirements for a bachelor of science in physics. Prereq: Cons. of a regular physics faculty member and Jr. stndg.

PHYS 4012/5012. Quantum Mechanics

3 sem. hrs.
Quantum states, state vectors, observables and operators. The formal structure of quantum mechanics. Time evolution of the state vector. The Hamiltonian. Position and momentum representations, and the wave function. One-dimensional wave mechanics and the harmonic oscillator. Three-dimensional wave mechanics. Symmetry, angular momentum, and the hydrogen atom. Fermions, and bosons. Perturbation methods. Offered spring term. Prereq: PHYS 2004 and MATH 2451.

PHYS 4024/5024. Modern Optics

3 sem. hrs.
Geometric optics, classical wave theory of optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, electromagnetic theory of light, interaction of light and matter, lasers and coherence. Offered spring term. Prereq: MATH 1451 and PHYS 1002; or MATH 1451 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 1451 and PHYS 1014.

PHYS 4031/5031. Electricity and Magnetism 1

3 sem. hrs.
Electro statics: Coulomb's law and Gauss's law. The electric field in dielectric materials. Microscopic theory of Ohm's law and steady state currents. The magnetic field, Biot-Savart law, Ampere's law, the vector potential. Magnetic materials. Electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law. Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves. Offered fall term. Prereq: MATH 2450 and PHYS 1002; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1014.

PHYS 4032/5032. Electricity and Magnetism 2

3 sem. hrs.
Boundary value problems: The solution of electrostatic and magnetostatic problems in continuous media. Microscopic theories of the dielectric and magnetic properties of materials. Electromagnetic waves in bounded regions. Reflection, refraction and dispersion. Radiation from accelerated charges. Antennae. Electrodynamics and the theory of special relativity. Offered spring term. Prereq: PHYS 4031/5031.

PHYS 4046/5046. The Physical Basis of the Biological Environment

3 sem. hrs.
The molecular processes of life occur in a complex aqueous molecular environment. Biological molecules and their environments are governed by the principles of physics. This course presents and explains physical techniques and models based on mechanics, thermodynamics, and electricity and magnetism, and shows how they apply to help characterize and understand the environments in which cells and biological molecules operate, while also helping to explain cellular and physiological processes. Prereq: PHYS 1002, 1004 or 1014 and CHEM 1002, MATH 1410 or MATH 1451.

PHYS 4057. Contemporary Physics Lab 2

2 sem. hrs.
Continuation of the experiments in PHYS 3056. Measurement and propagation of uncertainty, curve fitting, automated data collection and experiment control. Offered occasionally. Prereq: PHYS 3056.

PHYS 4062/5062. Introduction to Thermodynamics

3 sem. hrs.
Fundamental concepts of thermodynamics: temperature, internal energy, entropy and thermodynamic potentials. Laws of thermodynamics, their consequences and applications. Introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Offered fall term. Prereq: MATH 2450 and PHYS 2005.

PHYS 4065/5065. Experimental Methods in Molecular Biophysics

3 sem. hrs. 
An introduction to the field of biological physics which develops the science and illustrates the applications of the techniques of X-ray diffraction and spin resonance to problems of biological interest: protein structural dynamics, ion channels and transport through cell membranes. Prereq: PHYS 2004 and PHYS 4031, or PHYS 4046.

PHYS 4071/5071. Atomic Physics

3 sem. hrs.
Quantum mechanics of one and many electron atoms. Spin, orbital, and total angular momentum. Atoms in electric and magnetic fields, the Stark effect and the Zeeman effect. Atomic transitions, symmetry and selection rules. The periodic table and shell structure. Modern spectroscopy. Offered occasionally. Prereq: PHYS 4012/5012 and 4031/5031.

PHYS 4072/5072. Introduction to Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics

3 sem. hrs.
Experimental methods in nuclear and particle physics. Theories of nuclear structure, radioactivity, decay schemes, fission and fusion models, conservation laws. Elementary particle classifications and the Standard Model. Offered occasionally. Prereq: PHYS 4012/5012.

PHYS 4075/5075. Introduction to Solid State Physics

3 sem. hrs.
Crystal structure of solids, the reciprocal lattice and diffraction. Lattice vibrations and thermal properties. Electrons in metals, band structure and semiconductors. The Fermi surface. Dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Superconductivity. Offered occasionally. Prereq: PHYS 2005 and PHYS 4012.

PHYS 4931. Topics of Special Interest in Contemporary Physics

3 sem. hrs.
Topics drawn from areas of current interest such as astrophysics, atmospheric physics, condensed matter physics or particle physics. This course may not be used to satisfy the 30 cr. hr. minimum requirements for a bachelor of science in physics. Offered occasionally. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 4953. Seminar in Physics

1 sem. hr.
Critical analysis of the original works of scientists who have made significant contributions to Physics. This course may not be used to satisfy the 30 cr. hr. minimum requirements for a bachelor of science in physics. Offered occasionally. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 4995. Independent Study

1-3 sem. hrs.
Independent study of special topics in physics under faculty supervision. Topics selected by students. This course may not be used to satisfy the 30 cr. hr. minimum requirements for a bachelor of science in physics. Offered every term. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 4999. Senior Thesis

2 sem. hrs.
Independent research under the guidance of physics faculty. The topic may be chosen from any area of physics. Successful completion of the course includes a written thesis on the research and an oral presentation. This course may not be used to satisfy the 30 cr. hr. minimum requirements for a bachelor of science in physics. Prereq: Cons. of a regular physics faculty member and Sr. stndg.

ARSC 1020. Major Concepts in Modern Science 1

4 sem. hrs.
An interdisciplinary, integrated study of processes and principles of physics and chemistry. Topics will include: describing motion, energy and momentum, electricity and magnetism, waves, sound and light, reflection and refraction, heat, describing matter, chemical bonds, chemical reactions. Scientific inquiry as a means of knowledge: major technological contributions to modern societies, stability, information transfer, and evolution of biological systems emphasizing relevant chemical and physical processes in specific environments. The course consists of 3 hrs. of lecture and 2 hrs. of laboratory work. May be counted as Natural Science toward the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum requirements, and for elementary/middle school and middle/secondary teaching certification. Does not count toward major requirements for biological sciences, chemistry, physics, and broad field science for early adolescence/adolescence teacher preparation. ARSC 1020 offered fall term, ARSC 1021 offered spring term.

ARSC 1021. Major Concepts in Modern Science 2

4 sem. hrs.
An interdisciplinary, integrated study of processes and principles of biology, astronomy, and earth science. Topics will include: the cell, genetics, evolution and diversity, human biology, ecosystems, rocks and minerals, the earth (plate tectonics, land, and water cycles), weather, the solar system, stellar life cycles. Scientific inquiry as a means of knowledge: major technological contributions to modern societies, stability, information transfer, and evolution of biological systems, emphasizing relevant chemical and physical processes in specific environments. The course consists of 3 hrs. of lecture and 2 hrs. of laboratory work. May be counted as Natural Science toward the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum requirements, and for elementary/middle school and middle/secondary teaching certification. Does not count toward major requirements for biological sciences, chemistry, physics, and broad field science for early adolescence/adolescence teacher preparation. ARSC 1020 offered fall term, ARSC 1021 offered spring term.

 


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