Frequently Asked Questions

About Coronavirus

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Is there a threat to campus?

In coordination with the Milwaukee Health Department, the Marquette University Medical Clinic (MUMC) continues to monitor the recent outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a new Coronavirus (COVID-19).

The Executive Leadership Team has established a cross-disciplinary COVID-19 Response Team, which is meeting several times daily to evaluate changing guidance from public health officials — including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Wisconsin Department of Health Services and Milwaukee Health Department — to make recommendations to the ELT on establishing protocols and contingency plans related to the virus. There is a steering committee and five working teams dedicated to the following dimensions of campus response: medical, academic, employee, student life/residence life and external contacts

To protect yourself from influenza and other viruses, it is advised to:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Cover nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze.
  • Avoid close contact with ill individuals.
  • Stay home if you are ill.
  • The single best prevention against influenza is the vaccine. Influenza vaccine is still available at the MUMC.

I recently traveled to an area that qualifies for self-quarantine. What is the guidance on self-quarantining?

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services is recommending that any faculty, student or staff who has traveled WITHIN THE PAST 14 DAYS where there is community spread of COVID-19 (international and domestic locations) MUST SELF-QUARANTINE for 14 days, less the number of days since they arrived home, before returning to campus. For instance, if you returned from one of these areas 10 days ago, you must quarantine for 4 days. The CDC has an interactive map that shows the number of confirmed cases by state and the status of community transfer in each state – hover over each state to see the information. The CDC also has an interactive map that shows the number of confirmed cases by international country and the community transfer in each country – hover over each country to see the information. Students and parents who fit this criteria should not come to campus to retrieve belongings.

University operations – where possible – will move to a remote-working environment until at least April 10, at which point the university will reassess our overall situation.

Any employee who is self-quarantining should notify their supervisor and Human Resources.

Should I wear a mask to reduce transmission of the disease?

Public health officials, including the CDC and WHO, do not recommend that people without symptoms wear a mask.

Guidance from the World Health Organization

Wearing a medical mask can help limit the spread of some respiratory disease. However, using a mask alone is not guaranteed to stop infections and should be combined with other prevention measures including hand and respiratory hygiene and avoiding close contact – at least three feet distance between yourself and other people.

WHO advises on rational use of medical masks thus avoiding unnecessary wastage of precious resources and potential mis-use of masks. This means using masks only if you have respiratory symptoms (coughing or sneezing), have suspected COVID-19 infection with mild symptoms or are caring for someone with suspected COVID-19 infection. A suspected COVID-19 infection is linked to travel in an area in China where COVID-19has been reported, or close contact with someone who has traveled from China and has respiratory symptoms.

If there is a suspected case of coronavirus within the Marquette community, what will happen?

If a local case is reported, the Marquette University Medical Clinic will take immediate steps in accordance with CDC guidelines to respond to any health and safety risk to the campus community.

What do I do if I feel I’m being harassed, discriminated against or treated unfairly due to traveling to a place where there are confirmed cases of coronavirus?

Coronavirus is not specific to an ethnicity or race. Racist and discriminatory behaviors are not tolerated at Marquette University. In the spirit of community and in our Catholic, Jesuit tradition, we should support anyone who is feeling anxious or alienated for having simply traveled abroad.

Faculty and supervisors cannot tell students or employees to stay home based on their recent travel history or perceived nation of origin.

If students experience harassment or discrimination, they are encouraged to file a bias incident report.

Marquette community members who are from or have traveled to places where there are confirmed cases of coronavirus are valued members of our community and deserve to be treated with care, concern and respect.

What information can Marquette share regarding students, faculty or staff who have recently traveled to a place where there are confirmed cases of coronavirus?

In compliance with federal health and student privacy laws, the university will not release names or identifying information of any student or employee.

What should I do if the media calls?

Direct all media inquiries to the Office of Marketing and Communication, (414) 288-7448.

Why is the university asking faculty/staff/students to disclose COVID-19 self-quarantine?

When a member of the Marquette community self-reports a COVID-19 diagnosis, the university will work with the Milwaukee Health Department in the contact investigation. Only those individuals who came into close contact (defined as prolonged and proximal) with the patient will be notified and asked to self-quarantine for 14 days. Additionally, the Health Department will provide guidance on any needed cleaning and remediation for campus facilities. Our campus teams have the personal protective equipment needed for such a situation.

Due to federal privacy laws and the likelihood of a high volume of diagnoses in the coming days and weeks, including those affecting campus community members, the university will not be issuing mass notifications to the campus community. Please pray for all those in our Milwaukee and Marquette communities who are or will be affected by the pandemic.

What are some preventive steps for those who are sick and/or at risk of covid-19?

Please visit the School of Dentistry's webpage on preventive steps for the sick and at risk.


All Frequently Asked Questions

Campus Housing

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Will I get a room and board refund?

Students who are spring residence hall residents will receive a 50% credit to their Bursar account, which can be used for future tuition, room and board. Some exclusions apply; those students will be contacted separately. For those students who stayed in our residence halls after Spring Break, the credit will be prorated based on length of time living in the residence halls.

The remaining meal balance for Loyalty 50 plans will be credited to students’ Bursar accounts. Individuals who would like to keep their plan active or donate their remaining meals to students facing food insecurity should email orl@marquette.edu by March 27. Students who have an Anytime Meal Plan will receive a 50% credit to their Bursar account. Individuals who would like to keep their Anytime Meal Plan active should email orl@marquette.edu by March 27.

The goal is to have room and board credits processed by April 3.

I would like to donate my room and board refund back to the university for students who have financial hardships. Can I do that and how?

University Advancement is available to work with families who wish to support students who have financial hardships. Please contact Missy Egelhoff at melissa.egelhoff@marquette.edu or 414-288-6774 to make gift arrangements.

Will I receive a refund for my student fees?

No, student fees will not be refunded.

Will I receive a parking refund?

Students: All students with commuter parking permits will receive a refund for 50% of the semester parking expense. Students with 24-hour parking permits must email the Parking Office by March 27 if they wish to cancel their parking permit and retrieve their car from campus by April 1 to receive a 50% refund. If students cancel their permits and remove their cars after April 1, the refund will be prorated.

Faculty and staff: The university will suspend collection of parking fees for those who pay to park in a campus parking structure or surface lot for the month of April, which will be reflected in April pay periods. The university will continue to assess parking as the situation evolves.

I have a lease for a university-owned apartment. Am I required to vacate my apartment? Will I receive a refund?

The university-owned apartments are fully operational, the leases are valid and are being honored, and it is up to each individual student to determine whether they will continue to live in their apartment. The difference between a housing agreement (for students in the residence halls) and those with apartment leases (whether through the university or not) is that landlords, including Marquette, cannot ask students to vacate a lease except in the case of eviction. It is important to note that there are many students living in apartments who have nowhere else to go – Marquette is their only safe option.

How do I retrieve my personal belongings from my residence hall if I haven't already?

After early move-out is concluded on April 5, we will have nearly 2,400 students completely moved out of the residence halls, allowing us to reduce the number of staff needed on campus and consolidate residents so we have space to quarantine individuals or respond to community requests.

During the month of April, moving/storage companies will come to campus to collect belongings already boxed by students and to begin a packing and storing process for students requesting that service. You may find these storage companies listed on the Residence Life website if you wish to utilize this option

We are working to schedule the next round of move out beginning May 11, 2020, contingent on alignment with safer at home orders from state and local authorities. Please check the Campus Living portal in CheckMarq next week to sign up for a May move out time slot, knowing the dates could change if government orders change. There is no need to fill out an exemption form if you plan to sign up for a May move-out date.

We ask that prior to coming to campus for May move-out, each student verify via the Residence Life website as well as the Campus Living portal in CheckMarq that we are still allowing the move out process. We reserve the right to cancel these appointments as recommendations are made by city, state and health officials.

If you have additional questions, please contact ORL via email.

Please know the health, safety and well-being of our students and their families, as well as our Residence Life staff, is our top priority. Thank you for your patience and understanding during this very complex and fluid situation.

Does the Wisconsin "Stay-at-Home" order mean we can't come to campus to collect our belongings?

The “safer-at-home” order specifically exempted universities that are working on student relocation from residential facilities, so that we may provide that service safely to students and families who choose to move out now.

We live in a city/state with a “stay-at-home” order. Do we have to come to campus to collect our belongings now?

If your family does not feel comfortable coming to campus at this time, fill out this exemption form now. We will determine a time later in the semester when you may do so and will be in touch in mid-April.

If your family is not able to return to campus this semester, you can contact our moving partners, who will work with families beginning in April.

When will we be able to register for fall classes and housing?

Fall registration will begin April 6 for all undergraduate and graduate students. Students will receive new registration times by March 25. The fall university housing deadline will also be delayed; students will receive more information in the coming weeks.

What if I can’t return home and I need to live on campus?

Students whose circumstances require them to return to their on-campus residence should fill out this form so that we can communicate directly with them about proper protocols and provide appropriate support. It is not our intention to make blanket decisions without taking into account students’ unique circumstances.

Will university dining services remain open in the residence halls?

Minimal campus operations will remain functional to serve the limited number of students who are staying in our residence halls because they are unable to complete their classes remotely. Additional information will be shared as soon as possible.

I live on or near campus while attending school, but am living with my parents on April 1. Should I be counted in their census questionnaire?

Students who are staying with their parents, but would have otherwise lived at a campus or campus-adjacent address, should NOT be counted on their parents’ census questionnaire. Students who live in a residence hall and campus-owned apartments have been counted by Marquette through the Census Bureau’s Group Quarters count. Students who live in private off-campus housing should respond to their own invitation they received in the mail.


All Frequently Asked Questions

Travel

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I recently traveled to an area that qualifies for self-quarantine. What is the guidance on self-quarantining?

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services is recommending that any faculty, student or staff who has traveled WITHIN THE PAST 14 DAYS where there is community spread of COVID-19 (international and domestic locations) MUST SELF-QUARANTINE for 14 days, less the number of days since they arrived home. For instance, if you returned from one of these areas 10 days ago, you must quarantine for 4 days. The CDC has an interactive map that shows the number of confirmed cases by state and the status of community transfer in each state – hover over each state to see the information. The CDC also has an interactive map that shows the number of confirmed cases by international country and the community transfer in each country – hover over each country to see the information. Students and parents who fit this criteria should not come to campus to retrieve belongings.

Any employee who is self-quarantining should notify their supervisor and Human Resources.

How does this policy impact study abroad programs?

Visit the education abroad health and safety website for study abroad related Coronavirus information.

I have paid for a plane ticket/mode of transportation to return to Milwaukee after spring break. Will Marquette be reimbursing me for lost travel costs?

We appreciate your frustrations. Please check with your airline or travel provider — most are making accommodations at this time.

Are there restrictions on travel for work-related purposes?

All university travel is suspended for the rest of the fiscal year, through June 30.


All Frequently Asked Questions

Classes and Tuition

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Does the extension of remote learning through the end of the semester include final exams? How will final exams be administered?

Remote learning is extended through May 10, the end of the spring semester. This includes final exams, which will be taken online or through a remote learning method determined by instructors. The Office of the Provost will provide logistical information on remote final exams to faculty as soon as possible. A remote learning website has been created as a resource for students.

What is the Pass/Not Pass course grading option? How does it work?

For the Spring 2020 semester, the university is offering a Pass/Not Pass course grading option, which has been endorsed by MUSG Executive Board, University Academic Senate Executive Committee, Academic Deans Council, Academic Planning Group of the COVID-19 Response Team, and the Provost Cabinet.

  1. The university will still use the current grading system of letter grades (A-F) as articulated in the undergraduate bulletin as the default grading system. That means any student who wishes to can continue to use the normal grading system.
    1. Faculty will grade courses exactly as they have been doing.
  2. Students will have the OPTION to replace the letter grade they receive for each course completed during the Spring 2020 semester with three options: Pass, Low Pass, Not Pass (P/LP/NP). Definitions follow:
    1. Pass (P): credit; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of C or better in the course.
    2. Low Pass (LP): credit; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of C-, D+ or D in the course.
    3. Not Pass (NP): no credit; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of less than D in the course.
  3. For students who receive a grade of Pass, the normal academic program requirements to receive a course grade will be waived. For students who receive a grade of Low Pass, individual academic programs will determine whether academic requirements are waived.
  4. Students can elect to switch to pass/fail after letter grades are posted on May 12.
  5. Students are permitted to use this option until May 26. Any student who does not indicate they want to exercise the Pass/Not Pass option by that deadline will receive a normal letter grade.

The full policy is reflected online in the bulletin.

All programs in the School of Dentistry, Graduate School, Graduate School of Management and Law School, as well as the Health Sciences professional programs, are exempt from this option.

I am an undergraduate student - what else should I know about the grading policy change?

Recognizing the extraordinary impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of students, faculty, and staff, an alternative grading policy is enacted for Spring 2020 allowing students to choose CLASS-BY-CLASS to have the earned letter grade recorded or have it replaced by a Pass/Low Pass/Not Pass (P/LP/NP). Here’s the link to the policy in the Undergraduate Bulletin, the Graduate Bulletin and the Graduate School of Management Bulletin.

  1. What should I do right now? Do the best you can in all your classes. You put in good effort before break; use this time to get what you need out of the class. Learn the most you can – you are worth it.
  2. When do I choose whether to keep my recorded grade or have it replaced with a P/LP/NP? After faculty file grades for the semester using the standard letter grade scale (current deadline is May 12), you will have until May 26 to choose whether to keep the grade you earned or change it. No student will be able to make a change to P/LP/NP until May 12th after grades are posted.
  3. What do the grades mean?
    • Pass means you earned a grade of C or higher
    • Low pass means you earned a C-, D+ or D
    • Not Pass means lower than a D (failing grade)
    • P/LP/NP grades will not be computed in your GPA
  4. How do P/LP/NP differ?
    • Pass will earn credit and fulfill requirements;
    • Low Pass will earn credit and fulfill requirements unless your academic program states otherwise;
    • Not Pass will not earn credit or fulfill requirements
  5. A Low Pass will not fulfill pre-requisite or minimum grade requirements in certain programs. These will be available by the end of the semester, and you should consult your academic adviser to determine the best choice for you.
  6. How do I decide whether to keep my letter grade or to convert it to P/LP/NP?
    • Look at your GPA – and check the scale in the bulletin to convert number to the average grade you get.
    • Every grade that is at or above your average, you should keep as a letter grade. For those below, consider P/LP/NP.
    • Check with your academic advisor, particularly if you’re on an academic plan for not meeting GPA requirements for satisfactory academic progress or academic probation. If you are in an academic program that has licensure or certification requirements, it’s also important for you to consult with your advisor.
  7. Will my instructor know if I choose P/LP/NP? No, because students exercise the option to change their letter grades to P/LP/NP after instructors file grades, instructors are not notified which students change to P/LP/NP.
  8. What if I have other questions? Contact your academic adviser before you make your choice.

I am a graduate student or Graduate School of Management student - what else should I know about the grading policy change?

Recognizing the extraordinary impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of students, faculty, and staff, an alternative grading policy is enacted for Spring 2020 allowing students to choose CLASS-BY-CLASS to have the earned letter grade recorded or have it replaced by a Pass/Low Pass/Not Pass (P/LP/NP). Here’s the link to the policy in the Undergraduate Bulletin, the Graduate Bulletin and the Graduate School of Management Bulletin.

  1. What should I do right now? Do the best you can in all your classes. You put in good effort before break; use this time to get what you need out of the class. Learn the most you can – you are worth it.
  2. When do I choose whether to keep my recorded grade or have it replaced with a HP/P/NP? After faculty file grades for the semester using the standard letter grade scale (current deadline is May 12), you will have until May 26 to choose whether to keep the grade you earned or change it. No student will be able to make a change to HP/P/NP until May 12th after grades are posted.
  3. What do the grades mean?
    • High Pass means you earned a grade of B or higher
    • Pass means you earned a B-, C+ or C
    • Not Pass means lower than a C (failing grade)
      • HP/P/NP grades will not be computed in your GPA
      • How do HP/P/NP differ?
        • High Pass will earn credit and fulfill program requirements
        • Pass will earn credit but may not fulfill program requirements. Your specific academic program will make that determination. Contact your Director of Graduate Studies for guidance on this issue.
        • Not Pass will not earn credit or fulfill requirements
  4. How do I decide whether to keep my letter grade or to convert it to HP/P/NP? Talk with your academic adviser or Director of Graduate Studies prior to making a decision about replacing letter grades. In some cases, letter grades may be required at a later time (e.g., when applying for disciplinary certification, licensure or tuition reimbursement) and you will not be able to switch between letter grades or HP/P/NP grades after May 26th.
  5. What if I am an undergraduate student taking a graduate course? If you are an undergraduate student taking a graduate course and you decide to convert your letter grades to the alternative grading format, you will follow the HP/P/NP alternative grading scale used by the Graduate School or Graduate School of Management.
  6. What if I am a graduate student who is taking an undergraduate course? If you select the alternative grading policy, you must follow the alternative grading policy employed by the Graduate School, not the undergraduate version. In such a case, if you earn a C-, D+ or D in the undergraduate course, you will earn a grade of NP.
  7. Will my instructor know if I choose HP/P/NP? No, because students exercise the option to change their letter grades to HP/P/NP after instructors file grades, instructors are not notified which students change to HP/P/NP.
  8. What if my cumulative G.P.A. falls below 3.0 because of my work this semester? In a typical semester, graduate students whose G.P.A. falls below 3.0 are required to withdraw for academic reasons. However, this requirement will be suspended for the Spring 2020 semester. Keep in mind, however, that if your G.P.A. remains below 3.0 after the next semester in which you take classes, the required withdraw process will be in place. Also keep in mind that the Satisfactory Academic Progress standards for federal student aid eligibility have not changed - see https://www.marquette.edu/mucentral/financialaid/resources_elig_standards.shtml.
  9. What if my cumulative G.P.A. was below a 3.0 and I was working on getting it above 3.0 in the Spring 2020 semester? If the letter grades you earn this semester put your cumulative G.P.A. above 3.0, then keep the traditional grading system (i.e., do not choose the HP/P/NP option) and you will return to good standing. Otherwise, if you are currently on an academic remediation plan from a prior semester that was supposed to have been fulfilled by the end of Spring 2020, it will be automatically extended through Fall semester 2020.

I am a faculty member - what else should I know about the grading policy change?

Recognizing the extraordinary impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of students, faculty, and staff, an alternative grading policy is enacted for Spring 2020 allowing students to choose CLASS-BY-CLASS to have the earned letter grade recorded or have it replaced by a Pass/Low Pass/Not Pass (P/LP/NP). Here’s the link to the policy in the Undergraduate Bulletin, the Graduate Bulletin and the Graduate School of Management Bulletin.

  1. What should I do right now? Continue teaching and grading as per normal. Please be sure to file grades by the deadline. Students will have the option to convert their letter grades to P/LP/NP (or HP/P/NP for graduate and Graduate School of Management students) only after grades are filed.
  2. What should I tell students who are worried about their grades now? Encourage students to keep fully participating in your class and wait to decide on P/LP/NP (or HP/P/NP for graduate and Graduate School of Management students) until after they have their grades.
  3. Will I know if students choose P/LP/NP in the class I’m teaching this semester? No, students exercise the option to change their letter grades to P/LP/NP (or HP/P/NP for graduate and Graduate School of Management students) after grades are filed.

How can I decide whether Pass/Not Pass is the best option for me?

Students are urged to work with their academic advisers prior to making any decision regarding replacing letter grades. This is particularly important for students required to meet criteria for certification and licensure, as well as for students interested in certain graduate/professional programs.

Has the withdrawal deadline been extended?

Yes, for the spring 2020 term, the deadline for students to withdraw from courses with a grade of “W” has been extended until the last day of classes, May 1.

How do I return my textbooks?

Booq Marq will provide return shipping labels for textbooks. Learn more at Marquette Today.

Will the extension of remote learning have any effect on HLC or other accreditations?

The Provost’s Office, deans and department chairs have taken great care to ensure that the academic experience we are delivering remotely will fulfill accreditation requirements.

I have a clinical requirement for my program. How will I complete this requirement?

Deans of colleges where students are engaged in hands-on clinical experiences will be in touch with students to discuss next steps.

Are classes canceled?

Remote learning is extended through May 10, the end of the spring semester. This includes final exams, which will be taken online or through a remote learning method determined by instructors. Deans of colleges where students are engaged in hands-on clinical experiences will be in touch with students to discuss next steps. A remote learning website has been created as a resource for students.

Will tuition be refunded?

At this time, courses remain active through May 10. We will make a determination on any tuition refunds should courses be canceled.

Will I get a room and board refund?

Students who are spring residence hall residents will receive a 50% credit to their Bursar account, which can be used for future tuition, room and board. Some exclusions apply; those students will be contacted separately. For those students who stayed in our residence halls after Spring Break, the credit will be prorated based on length of time living in the residence halls.

The remaining meal balance for Loyalty 50 plans will be credited to students’ Bursar accounts. Individuals who would like to keep their plan active or donate their remaining meals to students facing food insecurity should email orl@marquette.edu by March 27. Students who have an Anytime Meal Plan will receive a 50% credit to their Bursar account. Individuals who would like to keep their Anytime Meal Plan active should email orl@marquette.edu by March 27.

The goal is to have room and board credits processed by April 3.

I would like to donate my room and board credit back to the university for students who have financial hardships. Can I do that and how?

At the request of some of our Marquette parents, families may gift a portion or all of their room and board credit to support Marquette’s Bridge to the Future Fund to assist students experiencing unexpected financial need. Families who wish to support Marquette in this way can contact Missy Egelhoff at melissa.egelhoff@marquette.edu or 414-288-6774 by March 27. All gifts, regardless of size, will help Marquette University to ensure that our students have the resources they need during this challenging time. Thank you for your consideration.

Will I receive a refund for my student fees?

No, student fees will not be refunded.

Will I receive a parking refund?

Students: All students with commuter parking permits will receive a refund for 50% of the semester parking expense. Students with 24-hour parking permits must email the Parking Office by March 27 if they wish to cancel their parking permit and retrieve their car from campus by April 1 to receive a 50% refund. If students cancel their permits and remove their cars after April 1, the refund will be prorated.

Faculty and staff: The university will suspend collection of parking fees for those who pay to park in a campus parking structure or surface lot for the month of April, which will be reflected in April pay periods. The university will continue to assess parking as the situation evolves.

When will diplomas be mailed to students?

The university intends to mail diplomas by early-June, barring any unforeseen delays in grading stemming from the shift to remote learning.

How does this affect Summer Studies?

Marquette’s robust Summer Studies program, which features a broad array of course options, will continue this summer. However, due to COVID-19, all 2020 Summer Studies undergraduate courses will be offered online to ensure that students can continue their studies from the safety of their homes. Students currently registered for on campus summer classes will be contacted and advised about switching to an online class.

Enrollment for Summer Studies is currently open. Summer Session 1 runs May 18 through June 27, and Summer Session 2 runs July 6 through Aug. 15.

Currently, 140 course sections are scheduled in a full, online modality. More will be added in the next few weeks. Students are strongly encouraged to register for Summer Studies to continue their education.

Summer Studies undergraduate courses are less expensive than classes in fall and spring, and with plenty of online options, students can study from home and reduce their costs even more. Students are encouraged to contact their advisers to identify the best class options for them.

Learn more at marquette.edu/summer-studies.

When will we be able to register for fall classes and housing?

Fall registration will begin April 6 for all undergraduate and graduate students. Students will receive new registration times by March 25. The fall university housing deadline will also be delayed; students will receive more information in the coming weeks.

I am a university instructor and do not currently have access to a laptop or the ability to create remote instructional materials. What arrangements will be made for me?

During the week of March 15, faculty will receive training in online course deployment and will be working to develop a plan for moving instruction online. It is recommended that faculty work on campus and use campus resources to produce their online curricula and to host synchronous (i.e., all students and the instructor are online at the same time) courses. If working on campus is not an option, applications used for online learning can be accessed from a personal computer. IT Services has a dedicated website with technical resources for working remotely.

How does this affect students studying at the Les Aspin Center in Washington, D.C.?

Les Aspin Center students have the option to remain in Washington, D.C., in Aspin Center housing. Students who wish to leave will be allowed to continue the academic portion of the program, and faculty will create a distance learning model for them. Students will work in their internships to the degree that is feasible. Students who want to stay will need to sign a statement agreeing to this situation. Should the situation in Washington, D.C., worsen from a public health perspective, students will be sent home.

Will Federal Work Study students continue to be paid?

Per U.S. Department of Education guidelines, all Federal Work Study students will continue to be paid during this time.

What things are being taught to faculty and staff in order to move all in person staff materials to online?

Led by Dr. John Su, vice provost for academic affairs, and Dr. David Schejbal, chief of digital learning, a team of experts from IT Services and across campus is helping faculty members understand how to use D2L and how to move their courses to that modality. In-person and remote training sessions will be held throughout this week; to aid in social distancing, remote trainings are encouraged. Faculty can access trainings in person, through Microsoft Teams or review recorded help sessions.

What programs will be used to ensure learning still happens?

D2L and Microsoft Teams are the designated software for campus. The university owns a Microsoft Teams license and students have had access to this app for the past year. As such, we did not want to introduce a new app so that we may maintain a consistent experience. Further, Microsoft Teams is more network friendly and provides options for students and faculty to adjust the instructional experience “on the fly” to ensure a greater quality experience.

The university asks for everyone’s patience as faculty and students learn and work through network challenges, navigating new apps and other challenges that may arise. ITS, The Center for Teaching and Learning, faculty, and staff will be posting technology and learning tips daily as we they hear concerns from students and faculty on the D2L and Microsoft Teams’ experiences.

Faculty members are encouraged to participate in remote trainings so that they may use one or both of the supported software platforms.

How can students without a WIFI connection or a reliable laptop continue to learn? Are there measures in place to also help them?

Marquette is looking to meet the need of students that may not have a computing device or WiFi service to leverage for online learning. For students whose unique circumstances require them to live on campus, Raynor Memorial Libraries will be open with limitations on the number of students at any given time. Further, IT Services is exploring other computer labs on campus that can remain open. For students at their permanent residences, we are encouraging students to use a home computer where available. Instructions on how to download Marquette’s Office 365 for collaboration and productivity (Outlook, Teams, Word, Excel, etc.), as well as how to access D2L are available on marquette.edu.

ITS has a limited number of laptops and personal hotspots available for loan. This number is limited so ITS encourages students to explore all their options, including contacting their local internet service providers about possible discounts or free services for students who are learning remotely. If there is a need for a laptop or hotspot, students should email the Help Desk with their name and phone number.

How is Marquette continuing to monitor COVID-19? When would students hear if online classes are for the rest of the semester or just until April 10th?

The Executive Leadership Team has established a cross-disciplinary COVID-19 Response Team, which is meeting several times daily to evaluate changing guidance from public health officials — including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Wisconsin Department of Health Services and Milwaukee Health Department — to make recommendations to the ELT on establishing protocols and contingency plans related to the virus. There are five working teams dedicated to the following dimensions of campus response: medical, academic, employee, student life/residence life and external contacts. These teams are constantly monitoring ever-shifting guidance from public health officials.

The university will make a determination on the remainder of the semester as soon as we have all the public health information available to us to make an informed decision that is in the best interest of our campus community’s health, safety and wellbeing.

Lastly, it’s important to emphasize that — although the current situation is highly fluid and challenging — the university is already prepared to offer a robust, online set of classes in the summer. Registration for summer classes is open, and students are encouraged to contact their advisers about summer classes.

Will Spring term course evaluations (MOCES) still take place?

Given the decision to move all courses online as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Provost Ah Yun has decided to suspend MOCES student course evaluations for spring term 2020. This decision was made after consultation with members of University Academic Senate, Marquette University Student Government, Graduate Student Organization, Dean’s Council, Committee on Teaching, and the University Committee on Faculty Promotions and Tenure. Students will still be given an opportunity to provide feedback about course experiences, but it will not be tied to individual course instructors.

What resources is the library providing for students at this time?

  • Students working remotely have access to most of the same resources and support are available on-campus. All they need is their CheckMarq username and password (the same one used for e-mail and D2L).
  • The library’s electronic resources are vast and include e-books, articles, newspapers, data sets, streaming videos, and digitized archival materials.
  • The library’s website offers a variety of ways for students to find materials and support they need to successfully complete research projects.
  • When students are stuck or want help, the library offers friendly, personalized online assistance in a variety of ways, from 24/7 chat to email.
  • The library’s guide to online learning is a great place to start, with information about how to set up remote access to library materials, find the resources they need, and more.

Is tutoring still be offered for remote learning?

Small tutoring groups will resume on Monday, March 23. Tutors will be reaching out to tutees to set up Microsoft Teams meetings. If a student has questions about tutoring, the student should email tutoring@marquette.edu.

Is academic coaching still be offered for remote learning?

Academic coaching is available for all students. Coaching sessions will be conducted through Microsoft Teams or over the phone. If a student would like to schedule an academic coaching appointment, the student should email academicsupport@marquette.edu.

Am I responsible for my student loans at this time?

U.S. Department of Education has suspended payments through Sept. 30, 2020. More information can be found at the Federal Student Aid website.


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Campus Hours and Events

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I have an event planned before May 10. What will happen to my event?

All events held on the Marquette University campus are canceled through May 10.

I have an event planned after May 10. What will happen to my event?

No decisions have been made regarding events scheduled to take place after May 10. Events after that date remain on hold until closer to the event, or the executive order remains in place, or the event is canceled by the hosting party. Recommendations on post-May 10 event cancellations, when requested, will be made on a case by case basis.

Will Commencement be postponed or canceled?

We have made the very difficult but necessary decision to postpone Marquette’s 139th Commencement ceremonies. We know this is just the latest in a series of changes our campus community – and especially our graduating seniors – have had to face. As parents ourselves, we have experienced firsthand that Commencement is the culmination of years of hard work for our graduates and their families. To give this special occasion the pomp and circumstance it deserves, we want to celebrate Commencement together, in person, and in a safe and meaningful way. A team from across the university is working on options, including the possibility of postponing the in-person celebration until August. We promise to be in touch with our spring 2020 graduates soon to share more details. With Commencement delayed, students who meet their graduation requirements will still have a graduation date of May 2020 on their diplomas and their degrees will be officially awarded in May 2020. The university intends to mail diplomas by early June.

Visit the Commencement website for more information.

Does the postponement apply to Baccalaureate Mass or college-specific ceremonies?

Yes. All Commencement activities are postponed.

Visit the Commencement website for more information.

Will the Raynor Library remain open?

Given very low numbers of students who are accessing Raynor Library in person, the library will close its physical space at 4:30 p.m. on March 27 and will move to all virtual resources. Students, faculty and staff working from home have access to most of the same library resources and support that are available when on campus:

  • Real-time librarian research and learning support is available via chat 24 hours per day, in partnership with other AJCU libraries.
  • Virtual research consultations and instructional support from librarians is available 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekdays.
  • Extensive online research resources are available, including more than 480 electronic databases and almost 2.5 million e-books on topics relevant to all disciplines.
  • Libraries staff will provide print material support, including book chapter and article scanning service with a 48-hour turnaround.
  • Faculty who need a book during the COVID-19 closure can request a purchase for direct shipment to their home.

Will the Child Care Center remain open?

The Child Care Center will close, effective March 27. Please see Marquette Today for more information.

Will Marquette Athletic events (practices, workouts, competitions, etc.) still take place?

No. The Big East announced that all 2019-20 seasons (practice, workouts, competitions, etc.) for Marquette Athletics have concluded, effective immediately. Additionally, the postseason Big East and NCAA tournaments have been canceled.

I have a vehicle on campus. Am I permitted to leave it there even though I’m not returning to campus? Will my vehicle be safe?

Students who have a 24-hour parking permit may continue to leave their vehicle parked on campus. Any student who is currently parked on campus without a 24-hour permit should contact Parking Services at (414) 288-6911. Similarly, any student parked in a surface lot on campus who would prefer to move to a structure should contact Parking Services for an assignment.

The Marquette University Police Department will continue to patrol all parking areas and residences, per normal operating procedure.

Will I receive a parking refund?

Students: All students with commuter parking permits will receive a refund for 50% of the semester parking expense. Students with 24-hour parking permits must email the Parking Office by March 27 if they wish to cancel their parking permit and retrieve their car from campus by April 1 to receive a 50% refund. If students cancel their permits and remove their cars after April 1, the refund will be prorated.

Faculty and staff: The university will suspend collection of parking fees for those who pay to park in a campus parking structure or surface lot for the month of April, which will be reflected in April pay periods. The university will continue to assess parking as the situation evolves.

I’m an admitted student for fall 2020. Where can I get information on the admissions process?

Please visit our Admissions page for more information.

What is the deposit deadline for incoming first-year students?

Marquette University will maintain a May 1 deposit deadline for incoming first-year students planning to enroll in the fall 2020 term, but will be extending the deadline for students who request an extension due to the impact of COVID-19 on their decision-making process. If you would like to request a deposit extension, please follow this link and complete the extension request form.


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Human Resources

Human Resources FAQs