Spring 2019 Courses

For students entering Marquette fall 2018 and after

Archived Core Honors Courses

CORE 1929H Core Honors Foundations in Methods of Inquiry
Note: Sections 901 and 902, 903 and 904, 905 and 906, and 907 and 908 are paired, respectively, and all students in each pair will work with both instructors.

CORE 1929H 901 Th 4:00 pm James South, Philosophy                    
CORE 1929H 902 Th 4:00 pm Dennis Brylow, Mathematics            
CORE 1929H 903 T 3:30–4:45 pm Andrew Kunz, Physics                          
CORE 1929H 904 T 3:30–4:45 pm Amanda Keeler, Communication    
CORE 1929H 905 T 12:30-1:45 pm Allison Abbott, Biological Sciences  
CORE 1929H 906 T 12:30-1:45 pm Gerry Canavan, English                        
CORE 1929H 907 Th 5-6:15pm William Hirsch, Physics                        
CORE 1929H 908 Th 5-6:15pm Tim Cigelske, Communication    

HOPR 1955H/Core Honors First-Year Seminar

HOPR 1955H 901 T/Th 9:30-10:45 am Gerry Canavan, English

Game Studies: This course explores the burgeoning academic field of game studies. Dividing our attention between video games and more traditional board games, we will consider the social impact of games and gaming on a variety of topics from the nuclear-powered "game theory" of the Cold War arms race to utopian dreams of a life of only games to the fraught ethical and political debates that have accompanied the rise of video games as multi-billion-dollar popular entertainment. Are games addictive? Are they bad for children? Are they bad for adults? Are they a waste of time—or, to paraphrase Steven Johnson, do games turn out to actually be good for you? We will also consider pop culture treatment of games and gaming culture in film, literature, and mainstream journalism, as well as recent documentaries like The King of Kong and The Ecstasy of Order.

HOPR 1955H 902 T/Th 12:30-1:45 pm Liza Strakhov, English

Description to come

HOPR 1955H 903 T/Th 3:30-4:45 pm Melissa Ganz, English

Imagining Evil: What is evil? Is it an inherent part of the human condition or does it stem from social environment or individual psychology? Are there any circumstances that excuse people for committing morally and legally reprehensible acts? And how have individuals responded to and resisted human cruelty? These questions have not only preoccupied philosophers, jurists, and psychologists but have featured prominently in literature. In this seminar, we consider how imaginative writers from the medieval period to the present day have approached such questions about the nature, origins, and consequences of evil. At the same time that we examine the contributions of literature to pressing moral, legal, and psychological debates, we work on honing your close reading and critical writing skills. Our readings will include selections from studies such as Philip Zimbardo’s The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil and Paul Bloom’s Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil as well as texts such as Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Pardoner’s Tale,” William Shakespeare’s Othello, John Milton’s Paradise Lost (selections), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitzescription to come

HOPR 1955H 904 MW 3:30-4:45 pm James South, Philosophy

Women Authors and Historical Context: Suffering and Form in Six Authors: This class will consider six famous female authors and the ways in which the historical context of the time of their writing shaped the style of their writing, despite their working in different genres and addressing different audiences and concerns. Authors to be read include: Diane Arbus, Hannah Arendt, Joan Didion, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, and Simone Weil. In addition to reading and reflecting on selected essays from these six authors, we’ll be guided by the book Tough Enough, by Deborah Nelson. The major element holding these authors together is that of clear-eyed realism and a rejection of emotionality in writing about their topics, which often involve close descriptions of the causes and experiences of suffering. A major theme of the course will be to reflect on what effect the current cultural climate might mean for how we approach thinking and writing about suffering. 

HOPR 1955H 905 MWF 9-9:50 am Jacob Riyeff, English    

Memory and Forgetting: Humanity and the Past: Memory is essential for human life and flourishing—through it we form cultures, personal identities, familial bonds, traditions of all sorts. And yet, it has been argued that one essential aspect of the modern project is precisely a selective “forgetting” of the past. In this class we will take a long, hard, and varied look at the uses and abandonment of memory on a cultural and individual level (primarily in the Western tradition) through the reading of literature, memorials, philosophical and political manifestos, and other “texts” from centuries ago and countries far away to the present moment in Milwaukee, WI, all to discern with critical and empathetic understanding the many different ways we as humans engage and forget the past and why.

HOPR 1955H 906 MWF 12–12:50 pm Jacob Riyeff, English    

Memory and Forgetting: Humanity and the Past: Memory is essential for human life and flourishing—through it we form cultures, personal identities, familial bonds, traditions of all sorts. And yet, it has been argued that one essential aspect of the modern project is precisely a selective “forgetting” of the past. In this class we will take a long, hard, and varied look at the uses and abandonment of memory on a cultural and individual level (primarily in the Western tradition) through the reading of literature, memorials, philosophical and political manifestos, and other “texts” from centuries ago and countries far away to the present moment in Milwaukee, WI, all to discern with critical and empathetic understanding the many different ways we as humans engage and forget the past and why.

   Core Menu Options

BIOL 1002H/Honors General Biology 2

BIOL 1002H 901* MWF 11-11:50 am Thomas Eddinger
Discussions (pick one) 
BIOL 1002H 961 T 2-2:50 pm Thomas Eddinger 
BIOL 1002H 962 T 3:30-4:20 pm Thomas Eddinger 
BIOL 1002H 963 TH 2-2:50 pm Thomas Eddinger 

*Quiz sections will be on four Thursdays: 1/31, 2/21, 3/21, and 4/11: 6-6:50 pm 

CHEM 1002H/Honors General Chemistry 2

CHEM 1002H 901* MWF 10-10:50 am Llanie Nobile, Lecture 
Honors Lab 941 W 2-4:50 pm 
Honors Discussion 961: W 1-1:50 pm 

CHEM 1002H 902* MWF 10-10:50 am Llanie Nobile, Lecture 
Honors Lab 942: W 2-4:50 pm 
Honors Discussion 962: W 1-1:50 pm Wasantha Lankathilaka

*Register for the lab first. The two Honors lecture sections are the same lecture; register for the lecture section that is linked to the lab you have chosen. 

CHEM 1014H/General Chemistry 2 for Majors

CHEM 1014H 901 MWF 9-10:50 am James Gardinier
CHEM 1014H is lecture, lab, and discussion 

PHIL 1001H/Honors Philosophy of Human Nature

PHIL 1001H 901 MW 2-3:15 pm, Pol Vandevelde
PHIL 1001H 902 MW 3:30-4:45 pm, Pol Vandevelde
PHIL 1001H 903 TTh 11-12:15 pm, Grant Silva
PHIL 1001H 904 TTh 12:30-1:45 pm, Grant Silva
PHIL 1001H 905 MWF 9-9:50 am, Owen Goldin

PHYS 1004H/General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2

Register for any PHYS 1004H* Lecture

901 MWF 10-10:50 am William Hirsch 
902 MWF 12-12:50 pm Staff 
903 MWF 1-1:50 pm Michael Politano 
904 MWF 2-2:50 pm William Hirsch 
Honors Lab 941 W 3-5 pm Melissa Vigil  
Honors Lab 942 W 5- 7 pm Melissa Vigil 

*Quiz sections will be on three Mondays (dates TBA) 6-7:50 pm

PHYS 1014H/Honors Classic and Modern Physics with Calculus 2

PHYS 1014H* 901Lec/Lab/Disc 901 MWF 2-3:50 pm Andrew Kunz 
*PHYS 1014H is lecture, lab, and discussion 

POSC 2201H Honors American Politics 

POSC 2201H 901 MWF 9-9:50 am Sam Harshner 

POSC 2801H Honors Justice and Power 

POSC 2801H 901 Honors Justice and Power TH 5-7:30 pm Darrell Dobbs 

PSYC 2050H Honors Research Methods and Design in Psychology 

PSYC 2050H 901 TTh 12:30-1:45 pm Astrida Kaugars 
PSYC 2050H 941 Lab Wed. 9-10:50 am Astrida Kaugars 

THEO 1001H/Introduction to Theology (preferably in the first two years)

THEO 1001H 901 MWF 10-10:50 am Aaron Pidel  
THEO 1001H 902 MW 2-3:15 pm Jennifer Henery
THEO 1001H 903  MW 3:30-4:45 pm Jennifer Henery
THEO 1001H 904 MW 2-3:15 pm Susan Wood
THEO 1001H 905 TTh 9:30-10:45 am Jennifer Henery
THEO 1001H 906 TTh 9:30-10:45 am Jeanne-Nicole Mellon Saint-Laurent
THEO 1001H 907  TTh 9:30-10:45 am, Marcus Plested

Upper-division Theology (any semester after THEO 1001H) 

THEO 2310H 901 MWF 10-10:50 am Deirdre Dempsey, Theology & The Visual Arts
THEO 2400H 901 MW 2-3:15 pm Ryan Duns, Title TBA