Core Courses Fall 2021

Courses Required for Core Honors First-Years:    

CORE 1929H Core Honors Methods of Inquiry

A 3 credit course taken either in fall or spring of the first year. Sections that meet at the same time are paired, and students in each pair will be taught by both instructors. Satisfies MCC Foundations in Methods of Inquiry requirement.

CORE 1929H 901   TTh   12:30-1:45pm   
Melissa Shew, Philosophy & Ann Millard, Occupational Therapy

Taught by one occupational therapy and one philosophy faculty, this discussion-based Methods of Inquiry course examines the relationship between the individual and a community through meaning making, strength finding, and values discernment.

*Sections 901 and 902 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

CORE 1929H 902   TTh   12:30-1:45pm 
Melissa Shew, Philosophy & Ann Millard, Occupational Therapy

Taught by one occupational therapy and one philosophy faculty, this discussion-based Methods of Inquiry course examines the relationship between the individual and a community through meaning making, strength finding, and values discernment.

*Sections 901 and 902 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

CORE 1929H 903   MWF   1-1:50pm   
Mike Donoghue, History & Elaine Grafelman

This course will explore ongoing debates over the requirements and needs of citizens in modern America from historical and scientific perspectives. Students will learn about the nexus between political formulations of citizenship as well as the ways science and scientists have influenced the definition of citizenship.

*Sections 903 and 904 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

CORE 1929H 904   MWF   1-1:50pm
Mike Donoghue, History & Elaine Grafelman

This course will explore ongoing debates over the requirements and needs of citizens in modern America from historical and scientific perspectives. Students will learn about the nexus between political formulations of citizenship as well as the ways science and scientists have influenced the definition of citizenship.

*Sections 903 and 904 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

  

HOPR 1955H Core Honors First-Year Seminar

Taken either fall or spring of the first year. Satisfies the MCC Foundations in Rhetoric requirement.

HOPR 1955H 901        MWF   9-9:50 am        Timothy McMahon, History

Modernity: Confidence, Creativity, Crisis 
The purpose of this course is to discuss the years between 1880 and 1914 in Europe, an age when technological advances, scientific discoveries, and wealth led European elites to see themselves at the pinnacle of civilization. They were modern, and they had created “modernity.” They expressed their confidence in art and architecture, and we will read key works from some of their leading lights, including Mann, Joyce, Conrad, Nietzsche, and Freud, among others. These same artists and philosophers also raised questions about the societies in which they lived, suggesting that the confident face presented by Europe’s great and good masked uncertainties, including the potential impact of social diversity, disease, and militarism. 

HOPR 1955H 902        MWF   12-12:50pm    Michael Wert, History

History and Trauma
This class explores the concepts of trauma, history, and memory as experienced by individuals and communities. We read works in the fields of psychoanalysis, sci-fi, philosophy, and history, to see how memory of historical events is affected by trauma, and what we can learn from them for understanding the Covid pandemic.

HOPR 1955H 903        MWF   1-1:50 pm       Michael Wert, History

History and Trauma
This class explores the concepts of trauma, history, and memory as experienced by individuals and communities. We read works in the fields of psychoanalysis, sci-fi, philosophy, and history, to see how memory of historical events is affected by trauma, and what we can learn from them for understanding the Covid pandemic.

HOPR 1955H 904        MW     2-3:15 pm        Alison Efford, History

Radical Relationships: Investigating the Intimate Lives of Civil War–Era Activists
In this seminar, we will dive into a collection of personal letters to and from the German Milwaukeean feminist, abolitionist, and writer Mathilde Franziska Anneke. We will use documentation of her intense, cohabiting romantic friendship with another woman to explore the interaction between the personal and the political. Students will have the opportunity to work in groups to research and present on different themes and events that arise in Anneke’s correspondence, including immigrants in the US Civil War, abolitionism, transatlantic radical networks, court martials, travel, parenting, illness, and death.

HOPR 1955H 905        TTh    12:30-1:45pm   Peter Staudenmaier, History

Race and Racism in Global History
The past several years have seen a remarkable upsurge in public discussion of racial inequality in the United States and around the world. Yet race and racism are not recent inventions; they have a lengthy history. This course invites us to examine the historical development of racism in a global context, looking carefully and critically at how beliefs about race have changed over time, and how they continue to impact our everyday lives and shape our society as a whole.  

HOPR 1955H 906        TTh      2-3:15pm         Jacob Riyeff, English

Humans and Other Natural Phenomena
Humans experience and represent the actual phenomena we call “nature” in a variety of ways. By investigating and dialoguing with a number of poetic and argumentative texts, as well as with one another inside and outside the classroom, this seminar will ask what it is to be human, how this differs from what it is to be anything else, how we relate to other natural phenomena, and why we represent them the way we do. Along with these more academic assessments, we’ll also question what ethical responsibility we as humans have for our own personal and collective impacts on the world around us.

HOPR 1955H 907        TTh      3:30-4:45pm   Jacob Riyeff, English

Humans and Other Natural Phenomena
Humans experience and represent the actual phenomena we call “nature” in a variety of ways. By investigating and dialoguing with a number of poetic and argumentative texts, as well as with one another inside and outside the classroom, this seminar will ask what it is to be human, how this differs from what it is to be anything else, how we relate to other natural phenomena, and why we represent them the way we do. Along with these more academic assessments, we’ll also question what ethical responsibility we as humans have for our own personal and collective impacts on the world around us.

 

THEO 1001H - Honors Foundations in Theology: Finding God in All Things

Taken either fall or spring of the first year. Satisfies the MCC Foundations in Theology requirement.

THEO 1001H 901 LEC    MWF   8-8:50am                                Jennifer Henery

THEO 1001H 902 LEC    MWF   9-9:50am                                Jennifer Henery

THEO 1001H 903 LEC    MWF   10-10:50am                            Michael Cover

THEO 1001H 904 LEC    MWF   11-11:50am                            Michael Cover

THEO 1001H 905 LEC     TTh     9:30-10:45am                        Deirdre Dempsey

THEO 1001H 906 LEC    TTh      11am-12:15pm                      Deirdre Dempsey

THEO 1001H 907 LEC    TTh      2-3:15pm                               Karen Ross

THEO 1001H 908 LEC    TTh      3:30-4:45pm                          Karen Ross


Courses Required for Core Honors Sophomores:

HOPR 2956H - Honors Engaging Social Systems and Values 1: Engaging the City

HOPR 2956H, mandatory for all Core Honors students (other ESSV1 classes do not satisfy the Core Honors ESSV1 requirement), focuses on the challenges and the opportunities of American cities, particularly our home city of Milwaukee. All sections emphasize community-engaged learning.

HOPR 2956H 901        MWF   9-9:50am              Sergio Gonzalez, History

Cities and the Narratives of Crises - This course offers an introduction to the twentieth-century history of cities in the United States, focusing specifically on the development of a crisis narrative in urban space. The course pays special attention to the complicated and conflicting ideas about cities that have emerged in relation to adjoining rural and suburban areas, examine the rise of the modern metropolis, interrogate the role of public health in urban development, and analyze the political, social, and environmental dimensions of cities’ growth. Focusing on economic, social, environmental, demographic, and cultural change, this course offers an introductory overview of what it has meant to be an urban denizen across the twentieth and early twenty-first century, especially in cities across the Midwest.

HOPR 2956H 902        MWF   12-12:50pm          Bryan Rindfleisch, History

This class will explore the Indigenous peoples, cultures, and communities of Wisconsin and the city of Milwaukee from the pre-Columbian era to the present day. Focus will include historical themes of colonization and decolonization, settler colonialism, cultural inclusivity, violence and intimacy, removal and “survivance,” assimilation and allotment, along with sovereignty and self-determination in addition to contemporary issues related to Native mascots, treaties, casinos, cultural representation, and more. An experiential class, this course will engage with the Indigenous peoples and communities of Wisconsin and Milwaukee throughout the course of the semester, be it powwows, Native guests / lectures, community and reservation visits, etc. 

HOPR 2956H 903        MWF   3-3:50pm              Sam Harshner, Political Science

This course focuses on current events in contemporary Milwaukee from a number of angles:  a. economic decline, b. racism, c. the legitimation crisis in the US government and d. climate change.  

HOPR 2956H 904        TTh      2-3:15pm             Robert Smith, History

Race & Law in Contemporary Urban America - This course will explore the intersections of race and law in American cities, considering arenas included, but not limited to: history, education, employment, housing, criminal justice and voting. Students will explore the course's themes and topics through community-informed experiences with local organizations engaging and shaping these policy agendas for the city of Milwaukee.

HOPR 2956H 905        MWF    2-2:50pm             Sam Harshner, Political Science

This course focuses on current events in contemporary Milwaukee from a number of angles:  a. economic decline, b. racism, c. the legitimation crisis in the US government and d. climate change.  


Courses Required for Core Honors Juniors and Seniors:

CORE 4929H – Honors Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice

CORE 4929H 901* LEC   MWF    1-1:50pm       Melissa Shew & Jennifer Henery*
CORE 4929H 902* LEC   MWF    1-1:50pm       Melissa Shew & Jennifer Henery*
CORE 4929H 903 LEC   MWF    11-11:50am     Jennifer Henery
CORE 4929H 904 LEC   TTh       2-3:15pm        Yoon Choi

* Retreat model - see email for more information. Sections 901 and 902 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

 
Core Menu Options for all Core Honors Students:

BIOL 1001H - Honors General Biology 1

BIOL 1001H 901 Lecture, TTh    9:30-10:45am & Th 6-6:50p  Martin St. Maurice
Honors Discussion 961   T    12:30-1:20pm
Honors Discussion 962   W    9-9:50am
Honors Discussion 963   W   12-12:50pm

CHEM 1001H - Honors General Chemistry 1

CHEM 1001H 901 LEC   MWF   10-10:50 pm   Llanie Nobile

            941 LAB   W        2-4:50 pm                   Vijay Vyas

            961 DIS   W        1-1:50 pm                   Vijay Vyas

CHEM 1001H 902 LEC   MWF   10-10:50 am   Llanie Nobile

            942 LAB   T          5:30 – 8:20 pm            Vijay Vyas

            962 DIS   T          3-3:50 pm                    Vijay Vyas

CHEM 1013H - Honors General Chemistry 1 for Majors

CHEM 1013H 901 LEC    MF       9-10:15 am    Adam Fiedler

            941 LAB   W        9-11:50 am                  Vijay Vyas

CLAS 3215 - How to Be a Cynic: Life According to Nature*

CLAS 3215 101 LEC        MWF 9-9:50am             Stephen Beall   

Explore life's persistent questions, such as “What is a good life?” “How can I overcome fear, disappointment, and stress?” “How can I flourish in my work and relationship with others?”, with the help of Epictetus’s Handbook, a summary of Cynico-Stoic ideal of ‘life according to nature’, and the anecdotal literature of the ancient Cynics.

*This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.

FREN 4350 - Francophone Civilization in English, “This is Us”: Identity in African Cinema*

 FREN 4350 101 LEC       W 5-7:30pm     Boubakary Diakite     

  *This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.

HIST 3106 – Gilded Age to the Progressive Era, 1876-1920*

HIST 3106 101 LEC      MWF 10-10:50am       Alison Efford

The Birth of Modern America: Between the Civil War and the end of WWI, the United States grew from a decentralized, rural nation into an industrialized world power. Telegraph wires and railroads spanned the North American continent, only to be superseded by telephones, radio broadcasts, and automobile traffic. Such technological innovation and the extraordinary economic growth of the period were connected to the dispossession of Native Americans, the conquest of overseas territory in Latin America and the Philippines, the ratification of Jim Crow segregation, and exploitative labor practices. Many Americans protested these injustices, making for tumultuous politics with interesting parallels to our own times. History 3106 follows a dramatic interpretive narrative and uses primary sources to expose an array of experiences, especially those of women, African Americans, and working-class immigrants. 

*This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.

HIST 4100 – Public History: Artifact, Place, and Memory*

 HIST 4101 101 LEC      W 2-4:30pm    J. Patrick Mullins

For communities as for persons, we are what we remember. The identity of nations and communities hinge on how the public recollects shared historic events and applies those lessons to present and future challenges. Historians have considerable power in shaping how the public remembers the past—as well as much to learn from the public. In this course, we will consider four pivotal historic events: the American Revolution, slavery and the Civil War, World War II and the Holocaust, and the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks. We will approach each event as a case-study in public memory, examining how events are interpreted for the public by historians through museum exhibitions of artworks and artifacts, preserved or restored sites (such as buildings, battlefields, cultural landscapes, and monuments), and documentary or Hollywood films. Graduate students and undergraduates will explore together the practical advantages and theoretical challenges of working directly with artifacts and places and engaging constructively with communities about their shared memories. Together, we will gain appreciation for the power of artifacts, places, and images to help public historians connect communities with their past and to help academic historians understand marginalized communities and hear silenced voices.

*This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.

LLAC 1001 – Introduction to Latinx Studies*

LLAC 1001 101 LEC     MWF 12-12:50pm      Sergio Gonzalez

This course is an introduction to the field of Latinx Studies and the history of Latinx communities in the United States. We'll examine the conditions that have led to the growth of Latinx populations and their expansion from regional communities to the country’s largest national minority. Through course readings, multimedia, and an interdisciplinary research project, we'll explore topics relevant to the study of Latinx peoples, including migration and immigration, ethno-racial identities, labor and class, imperialism, bilingualism, education, gender, sexuality, and more.

*This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.

 

LLAC 4931 – Topics in Foreign Language, Culture, and Literature: Chinese Culture through Films*

 

LLAC 4931 101 TIN      100% Distance Learning     Jen-Li Ko     

This course aims to enhance students’ understanding of contemporary Chinese culture and social issues through selected films. The course will cover the different areas of Chinese culture, such as history, contemporary culture, family values, customs, and practices, etc.  

*This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.    

PHIL 1001H - Honors Foundations in Philosophy

PHIL 1001H 901 LEC                TTh      9:30-10:45am   Corinne Bloch-Mullins

PHIL 1001H 902 LEC                TTh      11-12:15pm      Corinne Bloch-Mullins

PHIL 1001H 903 LEC                MWF   12-12:50pm       Michael Olson

PHIL 1001H 904 LEC                MWF   1-:150pm           Michael Olson

PHIL 1001H 905 LEC                TTh      12:30-1:45pm   Kimberly Harris

PHIL 1001H 906 LEC                TTh      2-3:15pm          William Wolf

PHIL 1001H 907 LEC                TTh      3:30-4:45pm     William Wolf

PHYS 1003H – Honors General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2

 

PHYS 1003H 901 LEC   MWF   10-10:50am & M 6-8pm    David Haas

PHYS 1003H 902 LEC   MWF   12-12:50am & M 6-8pm    David Haas

PHYS 1003H 903 LEC   MWF   1-1:50pm & M 6-8pm        Michael Politano

PHYS 1003H 941 LAB    W        6-7:50pm                          Melissa Vigil

PHYS 1003H 942 LAB    Th       4-5:50pm                          Melissa Vigil

PHYS 1003H 961 DIS     W       5-5:50pm                           Melissa Vigil               

PHYS 1013H - Honors Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1

PHYS 1013H 901 LEC              MWF   1-2:50pm                    Andrew Kunz

POSC 2201H – Honors American Politics

POSC 2201H 901 LEC              TTh      2-3:15pm                    Karen Hoffman

POSC 2801H - Honors Justice and Power

POSC 2801H 901 LEC              TTh      9:30-10:45am             Darrell Dobbs

POSC 4931 - Topics in Political Science: Gender and Administrative Ethics*

POSC 4931 103  LEC                TTh     12:30-1:45pm             Jennifer Fenton

This course will explore how moral and ethical principles apply to the work of public administrators in achieving the common good and benefits to society. The field of administrative ethics draws interdisciplinary insights from political science, social psychology, philosophy, political theory, and organizational leadership. However, the foundational ethical and political frameworks that have informed this interdisciplinary field of study have almost exclusively been originated by male theorists. This course introduces students to the traditional administrative ethics canon as well as alternative perspectives that have been excluded from the discourse. Special attention is paid to exploring the nuances of whistle-blowing and “guerrilla” cases that have occurred within U.S. public administration over the past thirty years. 

Course Format: Synchronous Online Learning. This is a fully remote course with regularly occurring class meetings. Students interact with one another and with the instructor during regularly scheduled class sessions as a large-group for lecture and announcements, and also in small-group instructor-facilitated discussion pods and work group pods.  

*This is not officially an Honors section, but it is restricted to Honors students and those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course. Students will enroll by permission number. 

 

THEO 3470H - Women and Theology Across Cultures

THEO 3470H 901 LEC              TTh      11am-12:15pm             Karen Ross

THEO 3530H - Honors Theology and Economics

THEO 3530H 901 LEC              MW     2-3:15pm                      Katharine Ward

 
Archived Core Honors Courses