Core Courses Fall 2022

Courses Required for Core Honors First-Years:    

CORE 1929H Core Honors Methods of Inquiry

A 3 credit course taken either in fall or spring of the first year. Satisfies MCC Foundations in Methods of Inquiry requirement.

CORE 1929H 901     MW 5-6:15pm      Amelia Zurcher, English and Honors & Jodi Blahnik, Counseling Center

TBD

CORE 1929H 902     TTh 12:30-1:45pm     Jacob Riyeff, English & Sofia Ascorbe, Honors

Ecology of the Self: Who Am I Here?
This class explores the relationships that students have with themselves, other people and species, and their natural habitats at Marquette University and Milwaukee through an ecological lens, while providing space for reflection, discussion, and engagement with practical college resources.

  

HOPR 1955H Core Honors First-Year Seminar

Taken either fall or spring of the first year. Satisfies the MCC Foundations in Rhetoric requirement.

HOPR 1955H 901   MWF   9-9:50am     Timothy McMahon, History

Modernity: Confidence, Creativity, Crisis 
The purpose of this course is to discuss the years between 1880 and 1914 in Europe, an age when technological advances, scientific discoveries, and wealth led European elites to see themselves at the pinnacle of civilization. They were modern, and they had created “modernity.” They expressed their confidence in art and architecture, and we will read key works from some of their leading lights, including Mann, Joyce, Conrad, Nietzsche, and Freud, among others. These same artists and philosophers also raised questions about the societies in which they lived, suggesting that the confident face presented by Europe’s great and good masked uncertainties, including the potential impact of social diversity, disease, and militarism. 

HOPR 1955H 902   MWF   10-10:50am     Michael Wert, History

History and Trauma
This class explores the concepts of trauma, history, and memory as experienced by individuals and communities. We read works in the fields of psychoanalysis, sci-fi, philosophy, and history, to see how memory of historical events is affected by trauma, and what we can learn from them for understanding the Covid pandemic.

HOPR 1955H 903   MWF   11-11:50am     Michael Wert, History

History and Trauma
This class explores the concepts of trauma, history, and memory as experienced by individuals and communities. We read works in the fields of psychoanalysis, sci-fi, philosophy, and history, to see how memory of historical events is affected by trauma, and what we can learn from them for understanding the Covid pandemic.

HOPR 1955H 904   TTh     9:30-10:45am   Ed de St. Aubin, Psychology & Will Futch

The Narrative Self
This course covers the science of Narrative Psychology as it relates to identity and the self-society connection. We explore the philosophical underpinnings of this area of scholarship and focus on research regarding the Life Story, an internalized account of one’s reconstructed past, perceived present, and anticipated future. We examine how these are psycho-socially constructed and rewritten throughout one’s life; how they emanate from individual attributes and are contoured by societal meta-narratives; how they relate to well-being and meaning in life; and, how we can be authentic authors of our own Life Stories.

HOPR 1955H 905   MWF    1-1:50pm     Jacob Riyeff, English

Humans and Other Natural Phenomena
Humans have had an ambivalent relationship with the world around us as far back as we can tell, but this ambivalence has accelerated at an unprecedented rate since the Industrial Revolution. Eliciting the loftiest praise from poets and prose writers, the earth itself and non-human species have also been brutely instrumentalized. Clearly beneficial to our health and well-being, frankly necessary to our survival, and indeed what we ourselves are, the natural world is also something ever more distant from the regular lived experience of more and more humans. As so many of us spend ever more time within the built world and the virtual world, how do we understand our relationships with other natural phenomena—since we have them whether we acknowledge them or not? How should we understand them? What are the consequences of different ways of living out these various relationships, especially for human self-understanding, human health, social justice, and the safety and thriving of all the other species who call earth home? How have artists, philosophers, and scientists of various stripes attempted to represent, explore, and encourage our species’ interactions with the other natural phenomena around us? These are some of the questions we’ll explore this term with such writers as Robinson Jeffers, Pope Francis, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Lorine Niedecker, Val Plumwood, Kate Crawford, and more. We’ll also take several field trips to allow for experiential, dialogic encounters, not only critical reading. 

HOPR 1955H 906   TTh      12:30-1:45pm     Heather Hathaway, English

Intersectionality and Identity in Modern American Literature and Culture
In Notes of Native Son (1955), James Baldwin claimed that in the United States “our passion for categorization, life fitted neatly into pegs, has led to an unforeseen, paradoxical distress; . . . [to] confusion, a breakdown of meaning.” But this seems counterintuitive: categorization is meant to do just the opposite--to define, classify, order and group. In this course, we will explore works of American literature that test Baldwin’s thesis, particularly with respect to individual and group identities shaped by race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation. We will draw from the fields of critical race and ethnic studies, sociology, psychology, history and literature. This interdisciplinary approach offers a valuable introduction to a variety of disciplines as you begin to hone your academic interests into majors/minors.

HOPR 1955H 907   TTh      2-3:15pm     Melissa Ganz, English

Justice and Judgment in the Western Imagination
How do we decide what is right and fair?  When, if ever, is it permissible to break the law?  What role should mercy and revenge play in legal and moral judgment?  How should we respond to historical wrongs and how can we rectify legal and social injustices today?  Such questions have not only preoccupied jurists and philosophers but have also figured prominently in literature.  In this seminar, we consider how imaginative writers from the classical period to the present day have examined the nature, problems, and possibilities of justice.  At the same time that we examine the contributions of literature to pressing legal and moral debates, we work on honing your close reading and writing skills.  Texts may include Sophocles’s Antigone; William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure; Herman Melville’s Billy Budd; Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life; Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers”; Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird; Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”; poems by Amanda Gorman, Nicole Sealey, and Reginald Dwayne Betts; Ida Fink’s The Table; and Ferdinand von Schirach’s The Collini Case.  Our literary texts will be supplemented by selections from jurists, philosophers, and historians, and we will view several film adaptations.

HOPR 1955H 908   TTh      3:30-4:45pm     Sarah Wadsworth, English

Radical Hope in Perplexing Times 
This course engages students in a wide-ranging exploration of hope as a “renewable and essential resource” (Radical Hope Project) powering positive change. Structured around four guiding themes drawn from Rebecca Solnit’s Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities, the course will begin by exploring “the uses of uncertainty” through readings in philosophy, theology, poetry, and literary criticism. We then turn to examine the survival of hope in times of crisis through its “roots in memory.” At the heart of the course are “the stories we tell”—including works of literature and art that salvage hope from unlikely material. Finally, we will contemplate hope as a stance of action through which “people are the power.” Books we will read together include the novels Middle Passage by Charles Johnson and Happiness by Aminatta Forna; Jonathan Lear’s Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation, which blends philosophy, psychology, and ethnography; Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language among the Western Apache, by linguistic anthropologist Keith Basso; and Solnit’s Hope in the Dark. Shorter readings may include poems and short stories; historical studies by Howard Zinn, Susan Griffin, and William Least Heat-Moon; philosophical writings by William James, Walter Benjamin, E. F. Schumacher, and Václav Havel; and Pope Francis’s ecological encyclical Laudato Si’: Care for Our Common Home. 

 

THEO 1001H - Honors Foundations in Theology: Finding God in All Things

Taken either fall or spring of the first year. Satisfies the MCC Foundations in Theology requirement.

THEO 1001H 901 LEC    MWF   8-8:50am                              Danielle Nussberger

THEO 1001H 902 LEC    MWF   9-9:50am                              Danielle Nussberger 

THEO 1001H 903 LEC    MWF   10-10:50am                          Jennifer Henery

THEO 1001H 904 LEC    MWF   11-11:50am                          Jennifer Henery

THEO 1001H 905 LEC    TTh     9:30-10:45am                       Christina Bosserman

THEO 1001H 906 LEC    TTh     9:30-10:45am                       Deirdre Dempsey

THEO 1001H 907 LEC    TTh     11am-12:15pm                     Christina Bosserman

THEO 1001H 908 LEC    TTh     2-3:15pm                              Christina Bosserman

THEO 1001H 910 LEC.   MWF   9-9:50am                              Jennifer Henery


Courses Required for Core Honors Sophomores:

HOPR 2956H - Honors Engaging Social Systems and Values 1: Engaging the City

HOPR 2956H, mandatory for all Core Honors students (other ESSV1 classes do not satisfy the Core Honors ESSV1 requirement), focuses on the challenges and the opportunities of American cities, particularly our home city of Milwaukee. All sections emphasize community-engaged learning.

HOPR 2956H 901   MWF   12-12:50pm     Bryan Rindfleisch, History

This class will explore the Indigenous peoples, cultures, and communities of Wisconsin and the city of Milwaukee from the pre-Columbian era to the present day. Focus will include historical themes of colonization and decolonization, settler colonialism, cultural inclusivity, violence and intimacy, removal and “survivance,” assimilation and allotment, along with sovereignty and self-determination in addition to contemporary issues related to Native mascots, treaties, casinos, cultural representation, and more. An experiential class, this course will engage with the Indigenous peoples and communities of Wisconsin and Milwaukee throughout the course of the semester, be it powwows, Native guests / lectures, community and reservation visits, etc. 

HOPR 2956H 902   MWF   1-1:50pm     Bryan Rindfleisch, History

This class will explore the Indigenous peoples, cultures, and communities of Wisconsin and the city of Milwaukee from the pre-Columbian era to the present day. Focus will include historical themes of colonization and decolonization, settler colonialism, cultural inclusivity, violence and intimacy, removal and “survivance,” assimilation and allotment, along with sovereignty and self-determination in addition to contemporary issues related to Native mascots, treaties, casinos, cultural representation, and more. An experiential class, this course will engage with the Indigenous peoples and communities of Wisconsin and Milwaukee throughout the course of the semester, be it powwows, Native guests / lectures, community and reservation visits, etc. 

HOPR 2956H 903   TTh     2-3:15pm     Robert Smith, History

Race & Law in Contemporary Urban America
This course will explore the intersections of race and law in American cities, considering arenas included, but not limited to: history, education, employment, housing, criminal justice and voting. Students will explore the course's themes and topics through community-informed experiences with local organizations engaging and shaping these policy agendas for the city of Milwaukee.

HOPR 2956H 904   TTh      9:30-10:45pm     Peter Borg, History

Religious Places, Divided Spaces, and Hope for the Future
Dr. Martin Luther King famously observed that America is most segregated on Sunday at 11AM. Was that true of Milwaukee while Dr. King called for the nation to redeem its troubled racial legacy? Is it still true today? If so, how is it that churches mirrored society's basest elements rather than demonstrating its highest ideals? This course introduces students to the history of Milwaukee by examining the city's religious heritage. Neither the city nor its religious landscape can be fully grasped without broadly understanding the contours of urban history, the role of race in America's founding and growth, the place of city churches and synagogues in welcoming immigrants, and the promise of God to "make all things new." Learn about Marquette's hometown and meet servant leaders throughout Milwaukee who are actively putting their faith into practice to bridge the divides that keep people apart on Sunday mornings.


Courses Required for Core Honors Seniors:

CORE 4929H – Honors Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice

CORE 4929H 901          MW 2-3:15pm              Jennifer Henery

CORE 4929H 902          MW 3:30-4:45pm         Jennifer Henery

CORE 4929H 903          TTh 11am-12:15pm      Daniel Collette

CORE 4929H 904          MWF 10-10:50am        Melissa Shew

CORE 4929H 905          MWF 11-11:50am         Melissa Shew

CORE 4929H 906          MWF 2-2:50pm            Jonathan Metz

 
Core Menu Options for all Core Honors Students:

BIOL 1001H - Honors General Biology 1

BIOL 1001H 901 LEC   TTh    9:30-10:45am & Th 6-6:50p  Martin St. Maurice
Honors DIS 966    T      2-2:50pm
Honors DIS 967    W     9-9:50am
Honors DIS 968    W    12-12:50pm

BIOL 1930 - Honors Special Topics in Biology*

BIOL 1930 701 LEC      M       4-4:50pm        Martin St. Maurice

*BIOL 1930 must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1001H*

**Enrollment will be done by permission number - please contact Erin if you are interested in taking this class.**

CHEM 1001H - Honors General Chemistry 1

CHEM 1001H 901 LEC    MWF   12-12:50pm    Dmitri Babikov

            941 LAB    W    2-4:50pm                   

            942 LAB     T    5:30-8:20pm   

            961 DIS     W    1-1:50pm   

            962 DIS     T     3-3:50pm   

CHEM 1013H - Honors General Chemistry 1 for Majors

CHEM 1013H 901 LEC    MF       9-10:15am     Adam Fiedler

            941 LAB   W     9-11:50am                  

COMM 4550 - Media and the "Other" *

COMM 4550 101 LEC        MW 2-3:15pm             Ayleen Cabas-Mijares  

*This course is a new Honors for All course in the Discovery Tier, a course that is open to all students at Marquette and gives Honors elective credit to students completing the Core Honors curriculum.  It meets the Basic Needs and Justice humanities or elective course requirement in the Discovery Tier.

**Enrollment for Honors students will be done by permission number - please contact Erin if you are interested in taking this class.**

ENGL 4932 - The Story Experience*

ENGL 4932 101 LEC        TTh 3:30-4:45pm        Sarah Wadsworth

  • This course is by application only. The application link is available on the website of the Center for the Advancement of the Humanities. Applications are due March 25, 2022.
  • Students will enroll in the course both fall and spring semesters. Students meet every other week to learn community-engagement theories and practices. The remaining hours of their coursework are conducted in the community, guided by a mentor.

*This is not officially an honors seciton, but those who enroll will receive Honors elective credit for the course.

LLAC 1001 - Introduction to Latinx Studies*

LLAC 1001 101   MW    2-3:15pm       Abel Arango

*This is not officially an honors seciton, but those who enroll will receive Honors elective credit for the course.

PHIL 1001H - Honors Foundations in Philosophy

PHIL 1001H 901 LEC    TTh      9:30-10:45am    Daniel Collette

PHIL 1001H 902 LEC    TTh      11am-12:15pm  Clark Wolf

PHIL 1001H 903 LEC    MWF    12-12:50pm       Michael Olsen

PHIL 1001H 904 LEC    MWF    1-1:50pm           Peter Burgess

PHIL 1001H 905 LEC    TTh      2-3:15pm           Sara Pope

PHIL 1001H 906 LEC    TTh      3:30-4:45pm      Richard Taylor

PHIL 1001H 907 LEC    MW      3:30-4:45pm      H. Sebastian Luft

PHIL 1001H 908 LEC    TTh      3:30-4:45pm      Daniel Collette

PHYS 1003H – Honors General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2

PHYS 1003H 901          MWF 9-9:50am; M 6-8pm        Jax Sanders     

PHYS 1003H 902          MWF 12-12:50pm; M 6-8pm    Timothy Tharp 

PHYS 1003H 903          MWF 1-1:50pm; M 6-8pm        David Haas      

PHYS 1003H 904          MWF 2-2:50pm; M 6-8pm        David Haas      

            941 Lab            W 6-7:50pm    

            942 Lab            Th 4-5:50pm

            961 Disc           W 5-5:50pm

PHYS 1013H – Honors Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1

PHYS 1013H 901          MWF 1-2:50pm                        Karen Andeen

POSC 2201H – Honors American Politics

POSC 2201H 901          MWF 11-11:50am                     Karen Hoffman

POSC 2801H - Honors Justice and Power

POSC 2801H 901          TTh 11am-12:15pm                  Darrell Dobbs

PSYC 4956H - Honors Advanced Undergraduate Research

PSYC 4956H 901        Day/Time TBD       Ed de St. Aubin   

THEO 3320H - Honors, The Event and Meaning of Vatican II

THEO 3320H 901          MWF 10-10:50am         Jonathan Metz

 

Waitlists 

If your preferred class is full at the time of your registration, please email Erin Brooker-Miller to be added to the waitlist. In the email include: your name, MUID, the class name and section number (ex: CORE 1929H 901), and the reason for your request.

 
Archived Core Honors Courses