Core Courses Spring 2021

Courses Required for Core Honors Freshman:    

CORE 1929H Core Honors Methods of Inquiry

A 1.5 credit course taken in both fall and spring of the first year for a total of 3 credit hours. Sections that meet at the same time are paired, and students in each pair will be taught by both instructors. Satisfies MCC Foundations in Methods of Inquiry requirement.

CORE 1929H 901   W   1-2:15pm   
Jenn Finn, History & Paul McInerny, Management

The Olympics & Society: This discussion-based Methods of Inquiry course combines approaches from both History and Business to investigate the Olympics as a microcosm of society. Students will examine “Olympism:” the philosophy and reasons for the games and how they are reflections of society. They will also research and discuss the historical development and philosophical foundations of the Olympics, through such topics as patriotism, politics, cheating, and inclusion.

*Sections 901 and 902 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

CORE 1929H 902   W   1-2:15pm   
Jenn Finn, History & Paul McInerny, Management

The Olympics & Society: This discussion-based Methods of Inquiry course combines approaches from both History and Business to investigate the Olympics as a microcosm of society. Students will examine “Olympism:” the philosophy and reasons for the games and how they are reflections of society. They will also research and discuss the historical development and philosophical foundations of the Olympics, through such topics as patriotism, politics, cheating, and inclusion.

*Sections 901 and 902 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

CORE 1929H 903   M   3:30-4:45pm   
Amelia Zurcher, UHP and English & Lani Stockwell, Occupational Therapy

What I Am To Myself:  I care not so much what I am to others as what I am to myself. I will be rich by myself, and not by borrowing. -Michel de Montaigne

Taught by one occupational therapy and one humanities faculty, this discussion-based MoI course helps students to look through the lenses of doing as art and art as doing to build their relationship with their own selves and their place in the world.      

*Sections 903 and 904 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*    

CORE 1929H 904   M   3:30-4:45pm   
Amelia Zurcher, UHP and English & Lani Stockwell, Occupational Therapy

What I Am To Myself:  I care not so much what I am to others as what I am to myself. I will be rich by myself, and not by borrowing. -Michel de Montaigne

Taught by one occupational therapy and one humanities faculty, this discussion-based MoI course helps students to look through the lenses of doing as art and art as doing to build their relationship with their own selves and their place in the world.      

*Sections 903 and 904 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*    

CORE 1929H 905   T   11-12:15pm   
Melissa Shew, Philosophy & Ann Millard, Occupational Therapy

 What I Am To Myself:  I care not so much what I am to others as what I am to myself. I will be rich by myself, and not by borrowing. -Michel de Montaigne

Taught by one occupational therapy and one humanities faculty, this discussion-based MoI course helps students to look through the lenses of doing as art and art as doing to build their relationship with their own selves and their place in the world.      

*Sections 905 and 906 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.* 

CORE 1929H 906   T   11-12:15pm    
Melissa Shew, Philosophy & Ann Millard, Occupational Therapy

 What I Am To Myself:  I care not so much what I am to others as what I am to myself. I will be rich by myself, and not by borrowing. -Michel de Montaigne

Taught by one occupational therapy and one humanities faculty, this discussion-based MoI course helps students to look through the lenses of doing as art and art as doing to build their relationship with their own selves and their place in the world.      

*Sections 905 and 906 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.* 

CORE 1929H 907   T   9:30-10:45am
Karalee Surface, UHP & Abigail Kanyer, Engineering

Creating Civilation - A Study in Inovations that Have Shaped our World:  This class will define innovation and explored various social, technical, scientific, and cultural innovations that have shaped both our global and local communities throughout history.

*Sections 907 and 908 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

CORE 1929H 908   T   9:30-10:45am 
Karalee Surface, UHP & Abigail Kanyer, Engineering

Creating Civilation - A Study in Inovations that Have Shaped our World:  This class will define innovation and explored various social, technical, scientific, and cultural innovations that have shaped both our global and local communities throughout history.

*Sections 907 and 908 meet at the same time, same day, same topic; enroll in either section.*

  

HOPR 1955H Core Honors First-Year Seminar

Taken either fall or spring of the first year. Satisfies the MCC Foundations in Rhetoric requirement.

HOPR 1955H 901   MWF   10-10:50am   Robert Bruss, English

Digital Media and Community: Society and culture today are profoundly influenced by the ways we communicate online. This class will examine how the internet and social media has dramatically shaped our media landscape, and the ways we build and foster community in those digital spaces. In particular, we will examine the new ways we actively participate in the media we consume: we “comment, like, and subscribe,” we post our fan theories, we make narrative choices in games, and we often become fellow creators ourselves. What are the implications of these new modes of engaging with the world? To help answer that question we will analyze (and sometimes even create) texts such as games, fanfiction, and memes, and we will discuss platforms such as YouTube, Twitch, Snapchat, and Twine. By engaging with such “participatory media,” this class will explore questions like: How does creative work develop and maintain community online? In what ways are these spaces of inclusion and/or exclusion? Where does meaning come from when we’re collaborating creators? How does this media shape our sense of ourselves and others?

HOPR 1955H 902   MWF   3-3:50pm   Robert Bruss, English

Digital Media and Community: Society and culture today are profoundly influenced by the ways we communicate online. This class will examine how the internet and social media has dramatically shaped our media landscape, and the ways we build and foster community in those digital spaces. In particular, we will examine the new ways we actively participate in the media we consume: we “comment, like, and subscribe,” we post our fan theories, we make narrative choices in games, and we often become fellow creators ourselves. What are the implications of these new modes of engaging with the world? To help answer that question we will analyze (and sometimes even create) texts such as games, fanfiction, and memes, and we will discuss platforms such as YouTube, Twitch, Snapchat, and Twine. By engaging with such “participatory media,” this class will explore questions like: How does creative work develop and maintain community online? In what ways are these spaces of inclusion and/or exclusion? Where does meaning come from when we’re collaborating creators? How does this media shape our sense of ourselves and others? 

HOPR 1955H 903   TTh    8-9:15am   Jacob Riyeff, English

Humans and the Natural World: Humans have had an ambivalent relationship with the world around them as far back as we can tell, but this ambivalence has accelerated at an unprecedented rate since the Industrial Revolution. Eliciting the loftiest praise from poets, the natural world has also been brutely instrumentalized. Clearly beneficial to our health and well being (and frankly necessary to our survival), the natural world is also something ever more distant from the regular lived experience of more and more humans. As so many of us spend ever more time within the built world and the virtual world, how do we understand our relationships to the natural world? How should we understand them? What are the consequences of different ways of living out these various relationships, especially for human health, social justice, and all the other species who call earth home? How have artists, philosophers, and scientists of various stripes attempted to represent, explore, and encourage our species’ interactions with the natural world around us? These are some of the questions we’ll explore this term with such writers as Robinson Jeffers, Pope Francis, Jacques Rousseau, Wendell Berry, and Robin Wall Kimmerer. We’ll also take several field trips and have guest speakers to allow for as many perspectives on this pressing issue as possible.

HOPR 1955H 904   TTh    9:30-10:45am   Jacob Riyeff, English

Humans and the Natural World: Humans have had an ambivalent relationship with the world around them as far back as we can tell, but this ambivalence has accelerated at an unprecedented rate since the Industrial Revolution. Eliciting the loftiest praise from poets, the natural world has also been brutely instrumentalized. Clearly beneficial to our health and well being (and frankly necessary to our survival), the natural world is also something ever more distant from the regular lived experience of more and more humans. As so many of us spend ever more time within the built world and the virtual world, how do we understand our relationships to the natural world? How should we understand them? What are the consequences of different ways of living out these various relationships, especially for human health, social justice, and all the other species who call earth home? How have artists, philosophers, and scientists of various stripes attempted to represent, explore, and encourage our species’ interactions with the natural world around us? These are some of the questions we’ll explore this term with such writers as Robinson Jeffers, Pope Francis, Jacques Rousseau, Wendell Berry, and Robin Wall Kimmerer. We’ll also take several field trips and have guest speakers to allow for as many perspectives on this pressing issue as possible.  

HOPR 1955H 905   TTh    2-3:15pm   Jacob Riyeff, English

Humans and the Natural World: Humans have had an ambivalent relationship with the world around them as far back as we can tell, but this ambivalence has accelerated at an unprecedented rate since the Industrial Revolution. Eliciting the loftiest praise from poets, the natural world has also been brutely instrumentalized. Clearly beneficial to our health and well being (and frankly necessary to our survival), the natural world is also something ever more distant from the regular lived experience of more and more humans. As so many of us spend ever more time within the built world and the virtual world, how do we understand our relationships to the natural world? How should we understand them? What are the consequences of different ways of living out these various relationships, especially for human health, social justice, and all the other species who call earth home? How have artists, philosophers, and scientists of various stripes attempted to represent, explore, and encourage our species’ interactions with the natural world around us? These are some of the questions we’ll explore this term with such writers as Robinson Jeffers, Pope Francis, Jacques Rousseau, Wendell Berry, and Robin Wall Kimmerer. We’ll also take several field trips and have guest speakers to allow for as many perspectives on this pressing issue as possible.  

HOPR 1955H 906   TTh    11am-12:15pm   Samantha Majhor, English

Native America in Pop Culture: This class explores the ways in which the idea of Native Americans has been produced in the American imagination over time. We will look at representations of Native America from literature, visual art, and film as well as pop art, sports mascots, public history monuments, and advertising in order to gain a broad sense of how Indigenous peoples have been represented. Along the way, we will look at the way Native people have responded to these mainstream representations through self-representation in writing, filmmaking, and artwork. The course will include primary texts in a variety of media forms from American Literature, Native American Literatures, and pop culture selections. 

HOPR 1955H 907   TTh    3:30-4:45pm   Melissa Ganz, English

Justice and Judgement in the Western Imagination: How do we decide what is right and fair? When, if ever, is it permissible to break the law?   What role should mercy and revenge play in legal and moral judgment? How should we respond to historical wrongs and how can we rectify social and legal injustices today? Such questions have not only preoccupied jurists and philosophers but have also figured prominently in literature. In this seminar, we consider how imaginative writers from the classical period to the present day have examined the nature, problems, and possibilities of justice. At the same time that we examine the contributions of literature to pressing moral and legal debates, we work on honing your close reading and writing skills.  Texts may include Sophocles’s Antigone; William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice; Herman Melville’s Billy Budd; Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience”; Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life; Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers”; Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird; and Ferdinand von Schirach’s The Collini Case. Our literary texts will be supplemented by selections from jurists, philosophers, and historians, and we will view several film adaptations.


Courses Required for Core Honors Sophomores:

HOPR 2956H - Honors Engaging Social Systems and Values 1: Engaging the City

HOPR 2956H 901   MWF   10-10:50 am    Sam Harshner, Political Science
HOPR 2956H 902   MWF   11-11:50 am    Sam Harshner, Political Science
HOPR 2956H 903   TTh      8-9:15 am       Adam Petersen, History
HOPR 2956H 904   TTh      11-12:15 pm   Theresa Tobin, Philosophy


Courses Required for Core Honors Juniors and Seniors:

CORE 4929H – Honors Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice: Integral Ecology

CORE 4929H 901   M   6-8:45pm   Dean Heidi Bostic, Arts & Sciences

This culminating course is designed to integrate the Marquette core curriculum by emphasizing preparation for life beyond Marquette. A special focus on vocation and discernment invites students to evaluate their coursework at Marquette along with their own world view and transcendent commitments in order to identify how they will work for justice in the world. CORE 4929H in Spring 2021 focuses on a collaborative, interdisciplinary analysis of integral ecology. Taking a systems approach, we will study integral ecology from a variety of perspectives including civic engagement, gender, and racial justice. We will consider forces that threaten integral ecology such as environmental degradation, increased competition over scarce resources, social inequality and bias, unchecked individualism, precariousness, loss of community and uprootedness. Integral ecology provides a framework to integrate academic experience and personal faith for the promotion of justice, providing the foundation for designing a good life after Marquette. Readings will include Jesuit core texts, essays on Catholic social teaching and texts that engage identity, values and life design, including Jeske, Making a Living Making a Difference. Each student will have the opportunity to analyze a particular local or global issue and to relate this issue to their future plans. The instructor welcomes questions about the course: heidi.bostic@marquette.edu.

 
Core Menu Options for all Core Honors Students:

ARBC 3220 – Arab and Muslim Women in the United States*

ARBC 3220 701   W   4-6:30pm   Enaya Othman

Uses the disciplines of history, gender, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Arab and Muslim women in the United States. Special focus on the intersection of globalization and locality, education and tradition, spatial and temporal contexts, individual and collective identities. Taught in English. Knowledge of Arabic language not required.

*This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.

BIOL 1002H - Honors General Biology 2

BIOL 1002H 901 Lecture, MWF 9-9:50am & Th 6-6:50pm, Thomas Eddinger 
Honors Discussion 961   T   8-8:50am
Honors Discussion 962   T   9:30-10:20am
Honors Discussion 963   T   12:30-1:20pm

CHEM 1002H - Honors General Chemistry 2

CHEM 1002H 901 Lecture, W 7-8:00pm, Llanie Nobile
Honors Lab 941              W    2-4:50pm   Vijay Vyas
Honors Discussion 961   W   1-1:50pm    Vijay Vyas

CHEM 1002H 902 Lecture, W 7-8:00pm, Llanie Nobile
Honors Lab 942              W    2-4:50pm   Vijay Vyas
Honors Discussion 962   W   1-1:50pm    Vijay Vyas

CHEM 1014H - Honors General Chemistry 2 for Majors

CHEM 1014H 901 Lecture, MF 9-9:50am, Scott Reid
Honors Lab 941   W   9-11:50am   Vijay Vyas
Honors Lab 942   W   9-11:50am   Vijay Vyas

LLAC 4930 – Special Topics in Languages, Literatures, and Cultures*
Survival & the Lives that Matter

 LLAC 4930 102   TTh   3:30-4:45pm   Michael Anthony Turcios

Survival and the Lives that Matter: Under the crushing weight of uncertainty, literary and visual cultures become mediums for artistic, cultural, and political expression and means of survival. How has the meaning of “survival” shifted across time? How does survival inform our understanding of how others survive oppression and legacies of inequality? This course centers the written and visual expressions of Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and other minoritarian groups within the United States and from the so-called Third World. We will study how racialized people employ literature, film, and other expressive cultures to survive, exist, and carve out a space for themselves. Topics include: survival as a relational experience, embodiment and trauma, spatiotemporal resistance, politics of care, and futurisms. Students will complete two projects: a midterm digital humanities component and a final research project on the topic of survival.

*This is not officially an Honors section, but those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course.

PHIL 1001H - Honors Foundations in Philosophy

PHIL 1001H 901   MWF   11-11:50am    Michael Olson
PHIL 1001H 902   MWF   12-12:50pm    Michael Olson
PHIL 1001H 903   MWF   1-1:50pm   Michael Olson
PHIL 1001H 904   MW     2-3:15pm   Yoon Choi
PHIL 1001H 905   TTh     2-3:15pm   Stephanie Rivera Berruz
PHIL 1001H 906   TTh     11am-12:15pm   Desiree Valentine
PHIL 1001H 907   TTh     12:30-1:45pm   Kimberly Harris 

PHYS 1004H – Honors General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2

 

PHYS 1004H 901 Lecture, MWF 9-9:50am & M 6-8pm, David Haas

PHYS 1004H 902 Lecture, MWF 10-10:50am & M 6-8pm, Cosmas Kujjo

PHYS 1004H 903 Lecture, MWF 1-1:50pm & M 6-8pm, David Haas

PHYS 1004H 904 Lecture, MWF 2-2:50pm & M 6-8pm, Cosmas Kujjo

PHYS 1004H 905 Lecture, MWF 3-3:50pm & M 6-8pm, Michael Politano

Honors Lab 941   W    6-7:50pm   Melissa Vigil
Honors Lab 942   Th   4-5:50pm   Melissa Vigil
Honors Discussion 961   W   5-5:50pm   Melissa Vigil 

PHYS 1014H - Honors Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2

PHYS 1014H 901 Lecture, MWF 1-2:50pm, Karen Andeen

POSC 2401H – Honors Comparative Politics

 POSC 2401H 901   MWF   10-10:50am   Lowell Barrington

POSC 2601 - International Politics*

 POSC 2601 104   MW   9:30-10:45am   Noelle Brigden

*This is not officially an Honors section, but it is restricted to Honors students and those who enroll will earn Honors elective credit for the course. Students will enroll by permission number. 

PSYC 2050H – Honors Research Methods and Designs in Psychology

PSYC 2050H 901 Lecture, MW, 2-3:15pm, Astrida Kaugars
Honors Lab 941   W   11am-12:50pm   Astrida Kaugars

THEO 1001H - Honors Foundations in Theology: Finding God in All Things

THEO 1001H 902   MWF   9-9:50am   Jennifer Henery
THEO 1001H 903   MWF   10-10:50am   Jennifer Henery
THEO 1001H 904   TTh      9:30-10:45am   Karen Ross
THEO 1001H 905   TTh      11am-12:15pm   Karen Ross
THEO 1001H 906   TTh      9:30-10:45am   Brian Bajzek
THEO 1001H 907   TTh      2-3:15pm   Brian Bajzek
THEO 1001H 908   MWF   11-11:50am   Christopher Gooding

THEO 2210H - Great Moments in Christian Theology (focus on St. Augustine)

THEO 2210H 901   MW   2-3:15pm   Sean Larsen


Archived Core Honors Courses