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Marquette University
Career Services Center

Holthusen Hall, First Floor
1324 W. Wisconsin Avenue
P.O. Box 1881
Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881
Phone: (414) 288-7423
Fax: (414) 288-5302
E-mail | Staff Directory

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Graduate Students

Career education is a cycle. Regardless of how old you are or what year you are in college, career success depends on these two essential steps prior to pursuing your post graduate experience.

  1. Clarifying my Career Goals
  2. Gaining career-related skills through an Assistantship, Internship, or other Career Related Experience

As you move through your own career development process you will most likely choose one of these post graduate paths to pursue

  1. First Job in Academia
  2. First Job in Industry
  3. First Alt-Ac Job


 

Clarifying my Career Goals

A good career decision can only be made when you become aware of your personal style, identify your interest and skill areas, and acknowledge your work values. Without these pieces of the puzzle, a career decision is not grounded or based on criteria which matters to you.

Here you can find a step-by-step guide to clarifying you career goals!

Schedule an appointment with a career counselor to assist you in making a plan as you move through each step.

  1. Identify Your Interests, Skills, and Work Values
    In order to decide which career field is most suitable for you; we must first determine what you like to do, what you are good at doing, and what is important to you.

  2. Define Your Satisfying Occupational Characteristics
    Now that you have developed a list of your interests, skills, and work values it’s time to bring them together and think about how you could apply these in different careers. Start by summarizing the main themes that you see in your list of interests, skills, and work values. 

  3. Complete a Career Assessment with a career counselor
    Assessments assist in identifying your interests, skills, and work values. Several assessments are available to students only after having had an initial intake appointment with a career counselor. 

  4. Conduct Career Research: Career Fields
    The best way to learn what it is really like in a particular career fields is through research. This can be done in two ways: online resources and informational interviewing (talking to people in the field).

  5. Start the Decision Making Process
    Decision-making is not to be taken lightly. People make decisions a variety of ways. Career decisions may include anything from choosing a major to comparing job offers. 

NEXT STEP: Gaining Career-Related Skills

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Gaining Career-Related Skills

Employers will not only want to know that you have the knowledge and expertise in your field from coursework, they will also want to know which skills and experiences you bring with you. Graduate students have many opportunities to gain career-related skills. Assistantship, Internship, or other Career Related Experiences are essential to your career success.

If you are not already engaged in a career-related experience such as an assistantship or internship, make an appointment with a career counselor to assist you in finding one. Assistantships available at Marquette are administered within each graduate program.

Here you can find a step-by-step guide to gaining career-related experience!

  1. Determine Your Transferrable Skills
    Transferrable, functional skills are built into your liberal arts education and are valued by employers. A bit of reflection will allow you to see that your courses, research projects, college work experience, extracurricular activities, internships and field study experiences have all been instrumental in providing you with skills that employers value.


  2. Conduct Informational Interviews with professionals in your field of interest
    Talking to people who currently are in positions and career fields that interest you is one of the best ways to gain valuable career information. The Career Services Center has resources to help you complete this step using LinkedIn and the Marquette University Alumni Association Network.

  3. Develop Your Occupational Targets
    Having one to three clear Occupational Targets helps you better communicate with those in your professional network and with potential employers. Your Occupational Target is a personal statement defining the specifics you wish to attain through work.


  4. Write Your Professional Resume and Cover Letter
    Resumes prove that you are qualified for the position. Therefore having a great resume that outlines your strengths, skills, career goals, and interest in a particular career field is necessary.

  5. Gather References and Letters of Recommendation
    It's important to be prepared to provide a list of employment references who can attest to the skills and qualifications that you have for the job you are applying for. Plan ahead and get your references in order, before you need them.

  6. Attend Career Fairs and Networking Events
    Simply showing up for career fairs and networking events is not enough. The Career Services Center has activities and resources to help you learn how to prepare and how to follow up for professional events.

  7. Create Your Elevator Pitch
    Having a prepared “sales pitch” that describes your occupational target or career goal will arm you with all you need to begin an intelligent and effective conversation with new professional contacts.  Be sure to include where you are now (degree, program, year in college), where you have been (career-related, leadership, part-time work experience), and where you are going (future goals).

  8. Develop Your Interviewing Skills
    Selling yourself in the context of a job interview involves talking about yourself in a way that effectively communicates your well-earned and genuine skills, accomplishments and talents that relate to your fit for a position. Knowing yourself, and what you have to offer employers will help you to confidently articulate your attributes during an interview.

  9. Build Your Career Wardrobe
    It is important to project a professional image. As you know, you only get one chance to make a first impression. Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

NEXT STEP: First Job in Academia | First Job in Industry | First Alt-Ac Job

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Seeking my First Job in Academia

You have worked hard for your degree. Now it's time to put all that hard work, skills, and experiences to use as you move toward the next step in your life.

Here you can find a step-by-step guide to getting your first job in academia!

Schedule an appointment with a career counselor to assist you in making a plan as you move through each step.

  1. Research the Specifics for your Discipline
    The faculty job search varies widely across disciplines, consult your advisor and mentors to:
    • Identify the annual hiring cycle for your field
    • Determine which application materials are usually required
    • Determine if search committees interview at annual conferences or other events
    • Learn typical deadlines and decision-making timelines

  2. Take part in the activities of a departmental search committee if possible

  3. Review & Develop Your Professional Network and Join LinkedIn
    More than 75% of new hires are identified through professional networks. Joining LinkedIn and connecting with industry-related groups and the Marquette University Alumni Association is a great place to start developing your network.

  4. Create Your Elevator Pitch
    Having a prepared “sales pitch” that describes your occupational target or career goal will arm you with all you need to begin an intelligent and effective conversation with new professional contacts.  Be sure to include where you are now (degree, program, year in college), where you have been (career-related, leadership, part-time work experience), and where you are going (future goals).

  5. Learn how to professionally follow up with new professional connections

  6. Write Your Professional Resume and Cover Letter
    Resumes prove that you are qualified for the position. Therefore having a great resume that outlines your strengths, skills, career goals, and interest in a particular career field is necessary.

    1. Write Your Professional Curriculum Vitae (CV)
    2. Write additional documents such as Writing Samples, Research, Teaching Statements & More

  7. Request multiple copies of your transcripts

  8. Gather References and Letters of Recommendation
    It's important to be prepared to provide a list of employment references who can attest to the skills and qualifications that you have for the job you are applying for. Plan ahead and get your references in order, before you need them.

    1. Approach faculty members, employers, etc. to write recommendation letters. Remember to provide them with any appropriate documentation (a copy of your CV, research statement, typical job description, etc.) and the deadline for submission. Think about sharing these Guidelines for letter writers.
    2. Send thank-you notes to your letter writers

  9. Develop a Target List of institutions where you would like to work

    1. Identify postings via HigherEdJobs, LinkedIn, The Chronicle of Education's Vitae, professional conferences and associations

  10. Develop Your Interviewing Skills
    Selling yourself in the context of a job interview involves talking about yourself in a way that effectively communicates your well-earned and genuine skills, accomplishments and talents that relate to your fit for a position. Knowing yourself, and what you have to offer employers will help you to confidently articulate your attributes during an interview.


  11. Learn more about Interviewing Dress for Success
    It is important to project a professional image.

  12. Build Your Career Wardrobe
    It is important to project a professional image. As you know, you only get one chance to make a first impression. Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

  13. Learn What to Expect in a First Round Interview

  14. Learn What to Expect in a Second Round Interview

  15. Learn about interview follow up techniques
  1. Start the Decision Making Process
    Decision-making is not to be taken lightly. People make decisions a variety of ways. Career decisions may include anything from choosing a major to comparing job offers. 

  2. Understand Financial Matters and Benefits
    Before making any decisions about your first job, be sure to explore and define your financial needs such as negotiating offers, weighing multiple offers, and other salary lessons. 

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Seeking my First Job in Industry

You have worked hard for your degree. Now it's time to put all that hard work, skills, and experiences to use as you move toward the next step in your life.

Here you can find a step-by-step guide to getting your first job in industry!

Schedule an appointment with a career counselor to assist you in making a plan as you move through each step.

  1. Research the Specifics for your Discipline
    Job search vary widely greatly by field and industry, consult your advisors and mentors to:
    • Identify the annual hiring cycle for your field
    • Determine which application materials are usually required
    • Determine if interviews take place at annual conferences or other events
    • Learn typical deadlines and decision-making timelines

  2. Attend Career Fairs and Networking Events
    Simply showing up for career fairs and networking events is not enough. The Career Services Center has activities and resources to help you learn how to prepare and how to follow up for professional events.


  3. Review & Develop Your Professional Network and Join LinkedIn
    More than 75% of new hires are identified through professional networks. Joining LinkedIn and connecting with industry-related groups and the Marquette University Alumni Association is a great place to start developing your network.


  4. Create Your Elevator Pitch
    Having a prepared “sales pitch” that describes your occupational target or career goal will arm you with all you need to begin an intelligent and effective conversation with new professional contacts.  Be sure to include where you are now (degree, program, year in college), where you have been (career-related, leadership, part-time work experience), and where you are going (future goals).


  5. Learn how to professionally follow up with new professional connections
  1. Learn more about Interviewing Dress for Success
    It is important to project a professional image.

  2. Build Your Career Wardrobe
    It is important to project a professional image. As you know, you only get one chance to make a first impression. Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.
  1. Write Your Professional Resume and Cover Letter
    Resumes prove that you are qualified for the position. Therefore having a great resume that outlines your strengths, skills, career goals, and interest in a particular career field is necessary.

    1. Write Your Professional Curriculum Vitae (CV)
    2. Write additional documents such as Writing Samples, Research, Teaching Statements & More (link)

  2. Gather References and Letters of Recommendation
    It's important to be prepared to provide a list of employment references who can attest to the skills and qualifications that you have for the job you are applying for. Plan ahead and get your references in order, before you need them.

    1. Approach faculty members, employers, etc. to write recommendation letters. Remember to provide them with any required recommendation forms, your resume, a stamped/pre-addressed envelope, and the deadline for submission.  Think about sharing the Guidelines for writing references and letters of recommendation.
    2. Pull together a standard list of references
    3. Send thank-you notes to your letter writers

  3. Conduct Career Research: Organizations
    The best way to learn what it is really like in a particular career fields is through research. This can be done in two ways: online resources and informational interviewing (talking to people in the field)


  4. Develop Your Target List
    Targeting employers and programs puts you in full control of your search. Think about those employers for whom you would like to work or programs and institution you would like to attend.


  5. Activate Your MU Career Manager Account
    MU Career Manager is the on-line career management tool for Marquette University students, alumni and employers.  

  6. Develop Your Interviewing Skills
    Selling yourself in the context of a job interview involves talking about yourself in a way that effectively communicates your well-earned and genuine skills, accomplishments and talents that relate to your fit for a position. Knowing yourself, and what you have to offer employers will help you to confidently articulate your attributes during an interview.


  7. Learn about interview follow up techniques

  8. Start the Decision Making Process
    Decision-making is not to be taken lightly. People make decisions a variety of ways. Career decisions may include anything from choosing a major to comparing job offers. 

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Seeking my First Job Alt-Ac Job

Alt-ac careers commonly refer to full-time non-teaching and non-research roles within higher education. These are typically staff and administrative roles in university areas such as Academic Affairs, Student Development, Development & Research and Business Affairs. A

Here are some resources to help you land your first alt-ac job!

Schedule an appointment with a career counselor to clarify your evolving career goals if it is that you are considering an alt-ac career.

  1. Directory of Alt-Academics

    1. #alt-academy Media Commons Project features contributions by and for people with deep training and experience in the humanities, who are working or are seeking employment in universities and colleges, or allied knowledge and cultural heritage institutions such as museums, libraries, academic presses, historical societies, and governmental humanities organizations. 
  2. The Humanities PhD at Work Chronicle of Higher Education Article highlighting the advantages and disadvantages PhDs have in the non-academic work place

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