College of Education Field Experience

Field Experiences

College of Education field experiences must be “developmental in scope and sequence and occur in a variety of school settings” (PI 34.15). Field experiences are designed to provide students with opportunities to work with pupils from diverse ethnic, racial, and socio-economic backgrounds in Milwaukee area schools.

Students must meet the requirements of Marquette’s College of Education along with the State of Wisconsin's Department of Public Instruction. Specific hours are assigned to different courses.

There are four formal and separate field experiences in the College of Education teacher preparation program for both undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students. 

EDUC 1000, EDUC 1001 (all teacher certification candidates and educational studies majors)

EDUC 1000: Introduction to Schooling in a Diverse Society

Students must work with Marquette’s Service Learning Program for field placements. Approved field sites can be found by course instructor here.

Students are expected to:

  • Observe and appreciate the complexity of the art and craft of teaching with respect to children, the teaching role, classrooms, and contexts
  • Appreciate the possibilities for teaching for the common/public good in a pluralistic society
  • Draw from a variety of resources
  • Reflect on becoming a teacher

EDUC 1001: Psychology of Human Development in Children and Adolescents in a Diverse Society

Students must work with Marquette’s Service Learning Program for field placements. Approved field sites can be found by course instructor here.

Students in this course will critically examine physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children and adolescents.  Variables such as gender, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, and language will be explored.

EDUC 4217/5217 (all teacher certification candidates)

EDUC 4217/5217: Methods of Teaching Youth & Children with Exceptional Needs (All Candidates)

Students must work with Marquette’s Service Learning Program for field placements. Approved field sites can be found by course instructor here.

Students are expected to:

  • Work actively with students
  • Focus on the individuality of students
  • Determine the differentiation required to meet individual student needs
  • Analyze which students may be at risk and what some underlying reasons may be (with the assistance of the cooperating teacher and other school support teachers)
  • Pay special attention to students diagnosed with Exceptional Education Needs (EENs) or special needs
  • Identify which interventions are utilized and the effectiveness of those strategies

This field experience requires that students spend a total of 20 hours in the assigned classroom over the course of the semester. Note: All 20 hours must be completed prior to exam week in order to successfully pass this course. The classroom must have at least one student who has an Individual Education Plan (IEP), or you must contact the Field Placement Office to seek a new placement.

Field experiences at the Professional Program level also occur in the Milwaukee area and provide opportunities for more active involvement and engagement in the student learning process. Field experience at this level emphasizes the application of pedagogical strategies learned in methods coursework. During various courses, you will participate in the following activities.

EDUC 2001: Teaching Practice I—Teaching Models and Instructional Design (all teacher certifcation candidates) 

EDUC 2001: Teaching Practice I—Teaching Models and Instructional Design

Students must request a field placement from the Field Placement Office by completing the online Field Placement Request Form.

This course is designed to introduce and provide and opportunities for practice in the fundamental skills necessary for effective teaching in varied contexts of practice (K-12 schools, community agencies, businesses).

All candidates (both elementary/middle and middle/secondary) take this course.

  • Field students will arrange one 2-hour visit per week for approximately ten weeks of semester at a mutually agreed upon time with their cooperating teacher.
  • Field students are assigned in pairs to one cooperating teacher (3+ years of experience with at least a tier-II, provisional license required.) We find that pairing our students at this level provides students with built-in opportunities for reflection and conversation and helps them challenge and possibly disrupt their preconceived ideas of what teaching practice should look like based on their experiences as students.
  • Field students must teach at least one whole-class lesson in a content area to be determined in concert with their cooperating teacher.
  • We encourage mentor teachers to treat Marquette students as apprentices being introduced to the multifaceted work of teaching across the domains of practice. We invite conversations about planning, environment, school policies, instructional decision-making, instruction, assessment, relationships with parents and families, collaboration with colleagues, and other related topics. We also want students to have opportunities to take responsibility in their classroom placements for increasingly challenging “teaching” tasks (teaching a small part of a lesson, performing small leadership roles, weighing in on some instructional materials and decision-making, etc.).

EDUC 4367/5367: Integrated STEM Methods (elementary candidates only)

EDUC 4367/5367: Integrated STEM Methods (MC-EA Candidates only)

Students must request a field placement from the Field Placement Office by completing the online Field Placement Request Form.

This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to enact core teaching practices supporting ambitious STEM instruction in grades 4-9 classrooms. Topics include core teaching practices supporting ambitious STEM instruction: (1) Identifying a “Big Idea”; (2) selecting worthwhile STEM tasks; (3) using representations to model STEM concepts, (4) eliciting and building on student thinking; (4) facilitating whole class discussion. Students are provided multiple opportunities to integrate theory with practice through analysis and reflection on their own teaching in STEM classrooms.

Only elementary/middle candidates take this course.

  • Field students will arrange two 2-hour visits per week for approximately ten weeks of semester at a mutually agreed upon time with their cooperating teacher.
  • Field students are assigned in pairs to one cooperating teacher (3+ years of experience with at least a tier-II, provisional license required.).
  • Field students must teach at least three whole-class lessons in either math or science, scheduled in concert with their cooperating teacher.
  • We also encourage mentor teachers to provide students with opportunities to evaluate, critique, select, and develop STEM curriculum materials including preparation of labs. We invite conversations about: planning in multiple time frames for STEM instruction (e.g. curriculum maps for the grade level and content area; semester-long calendars, unit plans, lesson plans, etc.); classroom environment particularly related to the content areas in STEM, safety with science materials; school policies relevant to STEM instruction; teacher decision-making about instruction, assessment, relationships with parents and families, collaboration with colleagues, and other related topics. We also want students to have opportunities to develop confidence in taking leadership for classroom routines (so that they aren’t just “observing” but are participating in more helpful ways).

EDUC 4047/5047: Advanced Teaching Practice in Middle and High School (only secondary candidates) 

EDUC 4047/5047: Advanced Teaching Practice in Middle and High School 

Students must request a field placement from the Field Placement Office by completing the online Field Placement Request Form.

The field component of this course takes place in a middle school classroom. This course is designed to examine the history, contexts, practices, and complexities of secondary education and their intersection with adolescent development. It focuses on development of skills for effective teaching in secondary schools including interdisciplinary planning and teaching, contextually and culturally relevant practices, functioning as members of learning communities and collaborative teams, analyzing and reflecting on instructional practices that matter for adolescents, and facilitating discussions and promoting deeper understanding. This course also meets the DPI Act 31 requirement for secondary majors.

Only middle/secondary candidates take this course.

  • Field students will arrange two 2-hour visits per week for approximately ten weeks of semester at a mutually agreed upon time with their cooperating teacher.
  • Field students are assigned to one cooperating teacher (3+ years of experience with at least a tier-II, provisional license required.).
  • Field students must teach at least three whole-class lessons in their major content area, scheduled in concert with their cooperating teacher, with at least one of these lessons focused on leading discussion.
  • Given that part of the course focuses on developing skill in leading discussions with large and small groups, as well as discussions about challenging, contemporary topics, it would be helpful if students were exposed to advisory periods or homeroom settings where discussions happen in schools.
  • Since this class also focuses on the varied forms and reforms of secondary schooling, we encourage mentors to talk with students about why their school is the way it is (e.g. if the school is an IB school, how did that happen? What does that mean? What does it mean to be a teacher in an IB school? What is it like for students? What can new teachers expect from school leaders in this type of school?)
  • We encourage mentor teachers to treat Marquette students as more advanced apprentices developing more sophisticated understandings of the multifaceted work of teaching across the domains of practice in middle schools and high schools. We invite conversations about planning, environment, school policies, instructional decision-making, instruction, assessment, relationships with parents and families, collaboration with colleagues especially about interdisciplinary learning and teaching, adolescent development and other related topics. In addition to their whole-class lessons, we also want students to have opportunities as appropriate to take responsibility in their classroom placements for increasingly challenging “teaching” tasks (teaching parts of lessons or taking leadership for class routines), weighing in on some instructional materials and decision-making, etc.).

 Advanced Teaching Methods with Content Specific Couse Numbers (only secondary candidates) 

Advanced Teaching Methods with Content Specfic Course Numbers 

Students must request a field placement from the Field Placement Office by completing the online Field Placement Request Form.

These courses are designed to allow for application of teaching methods to various content areas in middle and high schools. Field experiences occur in grades 9-12.

Only middle/secondary candidates take this course.

  • Field students will arrange two 2-hour visits per week for approximately ten weeks of semester at a mutually agreed upon time with their cooperating teacher.

  • Field students are assigned to one cooperating teacher (3+ years of experience with at least a tier-II, provisional license required.).

  • Field students must teach at least four whole-class lessons in their major content area, scheduled in concert with their cooperating teacher.

  • We encourage mentor teachers to treat Marquette students as more advanced apprentices developing more sophisticated understandings of the multifaceted work of teaching across the domains of practice in middle schools and high schools. We invite conversations about planning, environment, school policies, instructional decision-making, instruction, assessment, relationships with parents and families, collaboration with colleagues, and other related topics. In addition to their whole-class lessons, we also want students to have opportunities as appropriate to take responsibility in their classroom placements for increasingly challenging “teaching” tasks (teaching parts of lessons or taking leadership for class routines), weighing in on some instructional materials and decision-making, etc.).

Community-Engaged Internships I and II: EDUC 4896 and EDUC 4897 (EDST candidates only)

EDUC 4986 and 4987: Community-Engaged Internships I and II

EDUC 4986: Field experience in a community agency or educational site for the purpose of furthering the student's integration of theory and practice in a professional setting. Placement is for a minimum of 120 hours per semester under the supervision of site and University personnel and includes a weekly seminar.

EDUC 4987: Continuation of the internship experience (EDUC 4986). Placement is for a minimum of 120 hours per semester of supervised practice at the same site as the previous semester and includes a weekly seminar.

Interns will be expected to:

  • Complete 120 or more hours in your internship site as verified by your site supervisor. These hours must be spread out over the semester.
  • Hand in an evaluation from your site supervisor at the end of the semester and participate in a debriefing meeting with your site supervisor.
  • Attend and participate in all seminars, including completion of all required course paperwork documenting your hours with your site.
  • Compose and send email check-in reflections to your seminar instructor.
  • Plan and coordinate a site visit from your instructor in consultation with your site.
  • Develop, implement, and present on a project that adds value to the site.

To accomplish this, the intern will:

  • Discuss ideas for a project with a site supervisor, noting both the needs of the agency and the goals of the intern.
  • Create a timeline and expectations for the project with the supervisor: What will be done? What are the specific criteria for the project (using the rubric criteria as a guideline)? How will the supervisor and student know if the project meets expectations? When will it be completed? What is the shape, structure, or format of the project?
  • Complete the project over the course of the internship.

The presentation will take place at the end of the semester and will be attended by people from the internship sites, Marquette faculty and staff, members of the Educational Studies Advisory Board, and other interested guests.

Possible activities that the intern might engage in at the site include:

  • Talking with the staff about teaching, learning, diversity, planning, etc.
  • Working with individual clients and small groups of clients
  • Leading large group activities
  • Assessing programs
  • Preparing instructional materials
  • Creating assessments
  • Creating a bulletin board or display or media materials for the site
  • Teaching lessons planned with the supervisor or others from the site
  • Teachings lessons planned by the intern
  • Observing other professionals at the site
  • Talking with other professionals about the agency, its role in the community, etc.
  • Talking with parents or other family members
  • Attending professional conferences or other events with members from the agency