Languages in the Marquette Core Curriculum

Old Core of Common Studies

(Students entering before fall 2018)

Diverse Cultures

  • CLAS 3025 Mythology

  • ITAL 3210 The Southern Question and the Italian Experience of Emigration to America (NEW AY 2015-16)

  • SPAN 3300 People and Cultures of Spain

  • SPAN 3310 Peoples and Cultures of Spanish America

  • SPAN 4320 Contemporary Issues in the Hispanic World

  • SPAN 4400 U.S. Latino/a Literature

Literature and Performing Arts

  • FREN 3500 Introduction to Textual Analysis in French
  • GRMN 3210 German Literature in English Translation
  • GRMN 3500 The Modern German Short Story
  • ITAL 3210 Italian Literature in English Translation
  • SPAN 3500 Introduction to Literary Analysis
  • SPAN 3505 Introduction to Literary Analysis for Heritage and Native Speakers


New Core of Common Studies

(Students entering on or after fall 2018)

Writing Intensive

  • ARBC 3210 Arabic Literature in English Translation

    Arabic Literature in Translation explores the complexity and diversity of the societies of the Arab world through literary cultural productions, critical works, and historical texts composed by Arab Muslim and Christian men and women writers since the late nineteenth century. Students will examine the stylistic and cultural transformations of modern Arabic literature in conjunction with the historical and geographical developments (or ruptures) in the Middle East and North Africa. Such developments include British colonialism, Nasserism and Socialism, the Palestine-Israeli conflict, the Independence of Morocco, and the Islamic revival. We will, also, discuss social complexities, related to gender, class, nationalism, agency, and alienation and belonging, which arose due to the translocal and transnational interactions. Through critical written analyses, discussions, debates, presentations, and film, students will develop the ability to critically examine Arabic works of fiction and write scholarly analytical and argumentative essays that enable a strong engagement with the texts and their contexts.
  • ARBC 4931 Arab and Muslim women in the United States

    In this course, students will use postcolonial literature and feminist theories to investigate and analyze how global migration influences the restructuring of Arab and Muslim communities in the United States during different historical periods. Students will examine mixed and cross-cultural forms of social and cultural patterns, and explore identity constructions based on religion, region, ethnicity, and race. Students will analyze the role of language, culture, education, time of settlement, and affectual features of migration (i.e. memory, nostalgia, melancholy) in the integration of immigrants into diaspora communities. Students will also compare and explore the implications and influences of major historical events (i.e. the two European wars, decolonization, the Cold War) and economic developments (i.e. industrialization, free trade, new technologies in transportation and communication) on voluntary and involuntary travel and relocation.  (Also counts as a ESSV1 course, theme, “Crossing Boundaries”)
  • Span 3505, Introduction to Literary Analysis for Heritage and Native Speakers

    Span 3505 introduces students to the scholarly study of literature, and recognizes literature as a key resource to enhance Marquette’s culture of inquiry.  The course is designed to help heritage and native speaker students develop the analytical skills and critical vocabulary necessary to read, discuss, and write in Spanish about literary texts.  It involves selected readings in Spanish from different genres and periods within Hispanic literatures, including the literature by Latinos/as in the U.S. Discussions focus on the relationship between form and content, on the different artistic techniques writers employ, and on the function and social value of literature. From Medieval romances and Golden Age sonnets to contemporary U.S. Latino/a poetry about exile and migration, the course looks at the stories and tropes Hispanic writers have created to deal with fundamental philosophical and social questions, such as the existence of God, the brevity of life, or our need for roots in an increasingly global world.

    Prereq: SPAN 3005; or cons. of department chair 

Methods on Inquiry

‘Minds: Natural and Artificial’

Spanish/Film Studies+Psychology+Robotics: 

Description: Can robots, films, and emotions really uncover how the mind works? What about artificial minds? In this course, we will explore how robotics, psychology and film studies understand the mind and conceptualize the ambiguity of natural minds and artificial intelligence. While humans and robots “like” predictability we will explore how autonomous systems and humans learn to live with ambivalence.


Activism

Spanish/Cultural History+Community Writing+Digital Storytelling

Description: How do activists see past their own blind spots to identify the need for social change? How do people decide how things should change? And how do they put their ideas into action, especially the kinds of actions that mobilize others to work together for shared ends? In this course, students will answer these questions by studying activism through methods of inquiry that include the cultural historian's study of artifacts and representations of embodied acts and interview-focused case-based research common in many fields including writing studies.

Discovery Tier-ESSV 1

Basic Needs and Justice

  • FRENCH 4330 Francophone Studies in Human Rights
    An in-depth analysis of human rights issues of the Francophone world. Topics include ethnic or religious subjugation, immigration, political repression, and genocide. Variable subtitles depending on content and focus. This course emphasizes the fact that when basic human needs for acceptance, employment, and education are unmet it can lead to genocide, and when met, to reconciliation. Prereq:FREN 3001and FREN 3500; or cons. of dept. chair

  • Spanish 3710 Introduction to Spanish for Health Care
    Medical terminology, language skills, and cultural awareness and sensitivity are among the areas that will be developed in the course. Prereq: SPAN 3001 or SPAN 3005; or cons. of dept. ch. Not open to students with native fluency in Spanish.* The second semester of this course, Span 4715, “Advanced Spanish for Health Care” does accept native speakers.)

Cognition, Memory & Intelligence

  • SPAN 4120 Spanish Phonetics

    Study of Spanish grammar from a linguistic framework with emphasis on the reasons why Spanish speakers make the structural choices they make. Focuses on the continued mastery of the most difficult points of Spanish grammar, also addressing grammatical variation. Provides an introduction to morphosyntax of Spanish and background for advanced courses in linguistics. Prereq: SPAN 3001 or 3005; or cons. of dept.

  • SPAN 4110 Structure of Spanish
    Study of Spanish phonetics and phonological systems. The fundamental principles of phonetic analysis are introduced in a simple and concise manner in order to show how Spanish sounds are produced, how they fall into patterns and how they change in different environments. Emphasis on articulation, conditioned, dialectal variation, introductory training in phonetic transcription and the contrast between Spanish and English sound patterns.Prereq: SPAN 3001 or 3005; or cons. of dept. ch.

  • SPAN 4140 Spanish Second Language Acquisition
    Introduction to second language acquisition. Students participate in a critical examination of second language acquisition theories and research; discussion of the role of individual differences in language learning; consideration of the effect of study abroad on language development; and discussion of the impact of instruction on language acquisition. Prereq: SPAN 3001 or SPAN 3005; or cons. of dept. ch.

“Crossing Boundaries: The Movement of People, Goods, and Ideas”

  • SPAN 3700 Introduction to Business Spanish
    A practical overview of Spanish commercial terminology, vocabulary and correspondence used in modern and contextualized business settings in the Hispanic world. Prereq: SPAN 3001 or SPAN 3005; or cons. of dept. ch. Not open to students with native or near native fluency.

  • SPAN 4150 Spanish in the U.S. (also ESSV 2)
    Descriptive and critical overview of the linguistic practices of different Spanish-speaking communities in the United States. Focus on the characteristics of Spanish in contact with English, as well as the role that social factors like age, education, gender, race, nationality, and socioeconomic status have on the use of the language. Also examines social issues such as language attitudes, bilingualism and the role of education.

    Prereq: SPAN 3001 or 3005; or cons. of dept. ch. (Also counts as ESSV2 course)

  • SPAN 4320 Latin American and Latinx Contemporary Issues
    Focuses on the study and discussion of current topics, preoccupations, trends and issues pertaining to various Latin American and Latinx cultures in areas such as religion, educational reforms, ethnicity, race, identity, social stratification and economic development. Prereq: SPAN 3500 and SPAN 3300 or SPAN 3310; or cons. of dept. ch.

  • Span 4400 US Latinx Literatures
    Overview of the arts and literature produced both in Spanish and English by Mexican, Central American, and Caribbean diasporic writers in the United States, from the creation of the Mexico/U.S. border to the present. It examines the ways in which Latinx artists reflect on the forces that shape them as individuals and as members of their cultural community, and on the use of art to affect change.  Texts are grouped under five specific categories of analysis: colonialism, civil rights, exile, migration, and globalization.  Discussions not only focus on the issues that bind these varied authors together, such as the struggle for self-affirmation, the quest for validation, or the use of bilingual techniques, but also undertake to examine the ways in which Latinx texts reflect internal tensions in relation to issues of race, gender, sexuality, national origin, and legal status. Prereq: SPAN 3001 or 3005; or cons. of dept. ch.

Individual and Communities

  • French 4340 Francophone Studies in Gender and Sexuality: French Feminism
    An in-depth analysis of issues related to women and gender concerns in Francophone countries. Topics include theory (feminism, écriture féminine, gay and lesbian studies), law (family law regulating non-married couples, marriage, property rights, inheritance), and socio-cultural issues (religion, employment, public and private space, dress, linguistic accessibility, domestic abuse, and genital mutilation). Variable subtitles depending on content and focus. Prereq: FREN 3001and FREN 3500; or cons. of dept. ch.
  • SPAN 3500 Introduction to Literary Analysis in Spanish
    Basic literary concepts and analysis of the four genres, with intensive practice in reading, writing, development of critical thinking skills and oral comprehension. Prereq: SPAN 3001; or cons. of dept. ch. Not open to students with native or near native fluency.
  • Span 4400 US Latinx Literatures
    Overview of the arts and literature produced both in Spanish and English by Mexican, Central American, and Caribbean diasporic writers in the United States, from the creation of the Mexico/U.S. border to the present. It examines the ways in which Latinx artists reflect on the forces that shape them as individuals and as members of their cultural community, and on the use of art to affect change.  Texts are grouped under five specific categories of analysis: colonialism, civil rights, exile, migration, and globalization.  Discussions not only focus on the issues that bind these varied authors together, such as the struggle for self-affirmation, the quest for validation, or the use of bilingual techniques, but also undertake to examine the ways in which Latinx texts reflect internal tensions in relation to issues of race, gender, sexuality, national origin, and legal status. Prereq: SPAN 3001 or 3005; or cons. of dept. ch.

Unsolved Mysteries: Exploring Our Role in the Universe”

  • Class 3025 Mythology
    Greek and Roman myths and legends in ancient literature and religion. Influence of Classical Mythology on the Western literary tradition. The heroic exploits and modern psychological motifs. Survey and viewing of the enormous artistic legacy inspired by the Classical myths. Knowledge of Greek or Latin not required; does not count toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement.
  • French 4320 Francophone Critical Theories: Existentialism
    Examination of philosophies and critical theories originating from Francophone thinkers and related to the Francophone world. Topics include existentialism, structuralism, post-structuralism, and post-colonial theories. Variable subtitles depending on the content and focus. Students will explore this theme by analyzing literary and philosophical texts focusing on moral ambiguity, the human condition, and individual authenticity in an ultimately unfathomable existence.  Prereq: FREN 3001and FREN 3500; or cons. of dept. ch.
  • Span 3505 Introduction to Literary Analysis for Heritage and Native Speakers

    Span 3505 introduces students to the scholarly study of literature, and recognizes literature as a key resource to enhance Marquette’s culture of inquiry.  The course is designed to help heritage and native speaker students develop the analytical skills and critical vocabulary necessary to read, discuss, and write in Spanish about literary texts.  It involves selected readings in Spanish from different genres and periods within Hispanic literatures, including the literature by Latinos/as in the U.S. Discussions focus on the relationship between form and content, on the different artistic techniques writers employ, and on the function and social value of literature. From Medieval romances and Golden Age sonnets to contemporary U.S. Latino/a poetry about exile and migration, the course looks at the stories and tropes Hispanic writers have created to deal with fundamental philosophical and social questions, such as the existence of God, the brevity of life, or our need for roots in an increasingly global world. Prereq: SPAN 3005; or cons. of dept. ch. 


Note

For full course descriptions and prerequisites for the old and new core of studies, please visit the Marquette Undergraduate Bulletin.