Part Time Faculty

JodineMs. Jodine Deppisch
Criminology and Law Studies
Lalumiere Hall, 108
(414) 288-4037
jodine.deppisch@marquette.edu

Jodine's Bio

Jodine Deppisch is a graduate of Marquette who went on to work for the Wisconsin Dept. of Corrections for over 27 years. She served in numerous roles within the Department including Probation and Parole Agent and Supervisor, Deputy Warden at Waupun Correctional Institution, Warden at both Taycheedah and Fox Lake Correctional Institutions and Director of Assessment and Evaluation. Jodine has taught part-time at Marquette for over 25 years in the Criminology and Law Studies program. Jodine is passionate about education. In addition to her role at Marquette, She was a past trainer for the Wisconsin Department of Corrections, served six years on her local school board and nine years on the Moraine Park Technical College Board.

RobertDr. Robert W. Greene
Sociology
Lalumiere Hall, 108
(414) 288-4037
robert.w.greene@marquette.edu

Robert's Bio

I started my life giving happiness and even financial help to my family. My sister and I were the first twins born in Passaic County, New Jersey, in 1955. As a reward, my mother received $500.00 in free merchandise from Speigel’s department store for her bundles of joy.

After graduating from high school in 1973, I attended Fordham University for two years. In 1978, I moved to Denver, CO, returned to college and completed my undergraduate degree from Metropolitan State University in Denver. After leaving Denver in 1986, my wife and I moved to Illinois where I began my teaching career at a small, rural high school in Mount Sterling, IL, where I taught my first sociology classes, However, the “culture shock’ of rural living motivated me to complete my master’s degree.

I took a year off from teaching to complete my master’s degree from Western Illinois University in Macomb, IL, majoring in American history with a minor in Twentieth Century European history. My family moved to Madison, WI, and one year later I began teaching high school sociology, psychology, and history at Greenfield High School. I remained there for thirteen years, although on the side I began teaching college sociology at Milwaukee’s Alverno College in 1998.

I am currently working on  research, which focuses on service learning in higher education and transformational learning theory. I am interested in whether the experience of service learning enhances the likelihood that students will be transformed as a result of that experience. My experiences in teaching at Marquette and using Service Learning in my classes created my interest in that question.

I am the co-author of the high school sociology text, Sociology and You, which now is in its 2nd edition and thirteenth year of publication. In addition, my simulation game, Harmonyville: A Simulation for Understanding Racial and Residential Segregation was published in 2006 in the American Sociological Association’s Innovative Techniques for Teaching Sociological Concepts.


Additional Information

JohnDr. John Hammetter
Anthropology
Lalumiere Hall, 108
(414) 288-4037
john.hammetter@marquette.edu

John's Bio

Though I was born and raised in Milwaukee, I spent so much of my childhood in Wauwatosa that I’ve always considered it my home town. I graduated from Pius XI High School and received a B.A. in Anthropology from Marquette University, so I have a good understanding of its students and culture. In 1988, I helped excavate the Philistine city of Ashkelon in present-day Israel. In 1992, I conducted ethnobotanical fieldwork among the Navajo in New Mexico.

I earned my Ph.D. in Anthropology and Geography from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, in 2002. My dissertation, which drew from the disciplines of social history, landscape architecture, art history, cultural geography, and historical archaeology, represented the first anthropological study of residential yards and gardens. I asked why people endure the pain of transforming the space around their homes into gardens. Simply put, I concluded that both the act of gardening and the appreciation of their garden provide avid gardeners with a primary source of meaning in their lives.

I also spent 23 years in the Air Force, in both active duty and reserves, retiring in 2005. I was stationed in many different places during my military career—Germany, England, Spain, Turkey, Panama, and the United Arab Emirates, to name a few. I also traveled extensively on my own whenever possible, once going to Nepal for a month. While in these places I conducted informal ethnographic fieldwork through observation, participation, and inquiry, all of which characterize the anthropological enterprise. So I bring a great deal of personal experience into the classroom in addition to formal training.

JodineMs. Erin Hastings
Anthropology
Lalumiere Hall, 108
(414) 288-4037
erin.hastings@marquette.edu

Erin's Bio

Ms. Erin Hastings is a part time anthropology lecturer at Marquette University.

ThomasMr. Thomas Kukowski
Criminology and Law Studies
Lalumiere Hall, 108
(414) 288-4037
thomas.kukowski@marquette.edu

Thomas' Bio

After receiving my undergraduate degree in Criminal Justice from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, I was hired by the West Allis Police Department, where I was employed as Captain of the Patrol Division. I have nearly 30 years law enforcement experience, twenty-three of these years as a supervisor. I was also in charge of the Criminal Investigations Bureau, where I was responsible for the Sensitive Crimes Division, the Drug Unit, the Forensic and Technical Services Bureau, and the Gang Unit. I was also a former Police Association president for the labor union and later, president of the Administrative Officers Association. My experiences in labor-related issues, including collective bargaining, the legal issues in the administration of discipline, and being a member of our hiring board as an assessment center representative have been invaluable.

Over the years, I have continued my education in and outside the classroom. I graduated from the Northwestern School of Police Staff and Command, which is a 400-hour course for law enforcement executives. I’ve also received advanced training in Emergency Management, and I am the lead member on our Department’s Critical Incident Review Board.

Also, I instruct seminars on Critical Incident Response for Law Enforcement so that officers and administrators can manage critical incidents in a safer and more organized method. In addition to managing the initial response, the instruction emphasizes the National Incident Command System, Emergency Operations Centers, and Critical Incident Stress Management.

I obtained my Master’s Degree in Public Service from Marquette University. While attending Marquette, I had the privilege to get to know many professors who gave me a greater understanding and broader perspective of public service.

Dr. Farkas encouraged me to consider teaching at Marquette, and for that I am forever in her debt. I have noticed that as I progress, my perspectives and rewards have changed. I enjoy to train, coach, mentor, and encourage students and police officers to be the absolute best that they can be. When successful, for me, there is no greater reward.

RobertMr. Robert Rondini, J.D.
Criminology and Law Studies
Lalumiere Hall, 108
(414) 288-4037
robert.rondini@marquette.edu

Robert's Bio

I was born and raised in the city of Milwaukee. My parents were blue-collar, not having attended college. I emerged from my blue-collar roots with three siblings and developed an appreciation for the real meaning of family and the value of hard work.

I became interested in the study of law and criminal justice when I was in high school. I took law-related courses while in college at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and then went to law school at Northern Illinois University. I received Dean’s List honors while in law school along with other academic awards.

In 1990, I passed the Illinois bar and took a job in the town of Ottawa, Illinois, site of one of the famous Lincoln/Douglas debates. After a few months, it became clear to me that I wanted to return to Wisconsin and open my own law office. As a result, I took the Wisconsin bar in 1991 and opened my law office. I am currently a partner at the law firm Sayas, Schmuki, Rondini, Plum S.C.

Over the past 20 years, I have had the privilege of representing individuals from all different backgrounds. Over that time, I have never lost sight of a genuine and deeply held commitment to equal justice for all. I have logged hundreds of hours of community service representing neglected and abused children.

I have been honored to be a speaker or guest lecturer for the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Bar Association, Special Needs Adoption Network and the Milwaukee Police Academy Trial Advocacy Program.

I returned to teaching because of the satisfaction I get from the experience. I enjoy the atmosphere of the Marquette campus and the ability to be part of the university community and educational process. Teaching is not only an avocation but a form of community service which I find very rewarding.

MarkMr. Mark Waters
Criminology and Law Studies
Lalumiere Hall, 108
(414) 288-4037
mark.waters@marquette.edu

Mark's Bio

Mr. Mark Waters is a part time criminology and law studies lecturer at Marquette University.