Undergraduate Program Overview

The philosophy program at Marquette challenges students to gain precision and clarity in their own thinking and to develop the skills to raise creative, critical questions and to see topics and issues from a fresh point of view. The philosophy department offers opportunities for interaction with faculty, presentations and lectures from guest speakers, as well undergraduate groups designed for students interested in philosophy. The Philosophy Major has four areas of concentration available: History of Philosophy, Ethics and Values, Social, Political and Legal Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and Mind.

Philosophy Major

Philosophy B.A./M.A. Program

Philosophy Minor

Interdisciplinary Minors



Undergraduate Program Highlights

Below are a few of the benefits you will receive from a Philosophy degree from Marquette University.

Key Program Takeaways

  • Explore enduring questions
    Focus on questions that are fundamental for all people: How should we live—individually and socially? What gives our lives meaning and purpose? What should we believe, and how can we be confident that our beliefs are true? These are the questions that have occupied philosophers for centuries, and that occupy us as we live our lives. Philosophy seeks to give rigorous, well thought out answers to these questions, or, at least, to help us frame the right approaches in the search for truth.
  • Work towards the Marquette goal of becoming informed global citizens
    Explore fundamental questions of social justice, race, gender, immigration, human rights, etc.
  • Develop critical thinking skills
    Gain precision and clarity in your own thinking: learn to construct and evaluate arguments, compare and contrast different positions, formulate and solve problems, study topics from various points of view. Develop the skills to raise creative, critical questions—to think ‘out of the box—and to see topics and issues from a fresh point of view.
  • Develop independence as a thinker
    Learn to take and defend your own positions; to accept constructive criticism and reevaluate your own positions; to take the viewpoint of others and creatively and rigorously relate it to your own views.
  • Interact with faculty and classmates
    Dialogue with others — it’s absolutely vital to studying philosophy. The philosophy department offers opportunities for interaction with faculty, presentations and lectures from guest speakers, as well undergraduate groups designed for students interested in philosophy


Undergraduate Resources