Economics Department

Economics at Marquette University is offered as an undergraduate major and minor in the College of Business Administration (Business Economics) and Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences (Economics). An interdisciplinary major in Applied Mathematical Economics is also offered.  Graduate students study global economic issues in great depth in the Master of Science in Applied Economics (MSAE) and MBA programs. Further, undergraduate students may sign up for a five-year program to complete both the bachelor’s and MSAE degrees concurrently.

The department is led by 12 full-time, Ph.D.-level faculty members who are award-winning scholars in their field. Many have practical experience, having worked for or consulted with organizations such as the Wisconsin Realtors Association, the Connecticut Department of Labor, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and more.

Program highlights

  • Economics graduates are recruited by leading employers in the region and the nation, including The Kohler Company, Kohl’s Department Stores, Accenture, US Bank, UnitedHealthcare, and many more.
  • Economics faculty members are active applied scholars who publish in top peer-reviewed journals, such as Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Public Choice, Review of International Economics, Kyklos, Economic Inquiry and others.
  • The Applied Global Business Learning program and Marquette-led travel & study abroad in Economics: 'Doing Business in Central Europe' provide students with opportunities to apply their business skills in real-world settings in developing countries and abroad.

Center for Applied Economics

The Center for Applied Economics provides a focal point for addressing the increasing importance of global economic issues.  The center sponsors numerous activities at Marquette to expand awareness of global economic concerns, including the Distinguished Speaker Series in Economic Issues, the Marburg Memorial Lecture, and public presentations on contemporary economic issues.